Royal Moroccan Armed Forces


 
AccueilS'enregistrerConnexion
Culture judéo-marocaine 5 4.5 8
Partagez | 
 

 Culture judéo-marocaine

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1 ... 9 ... 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Suivant
AuteurMessage
juba2
General de Division
General de Division


messages: 4116
Inscrit le: 02/04/2008
Localisation: USA
Nationalité: MoroccanUS
Médailles de mérite:


MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 6:23

sorius a écrit:
osmali a écrit:
Fremo a écrit:


à Ashdode, SM le ROI a envoyé une délégation pour assister aux féstivités avec la communauté marocaine là bas ...



ils ont annoncé la nouvelle aux Jt de la télé nationale ? normalement l'état marocain boycotte Israël ? je me trompe ?
mais pas ces citoyens marocain santa

Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
osmali
Aspirant
Aspirant


messages: 523
Inscrit le: 04/11/2011
Localisation: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti //MENA
Nationalité: Turquie
Médailles de mérite:


MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 12:14

juba2 a écrit:
sorius a écrit:
osmali a écrit:




ils ont annoncé la nouvelle aux Jt de la télé nationale ? normalement l'état marocain boycotte Israël ? je me trompe ?
mais pas ces citoyens marocain santa

Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.

je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?

_________________

"Do you believe a man can change his destiny?"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XogzGNXpRoM
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
sorius
Commandant
Commandant


messages: 1119
Inscrit le: 18/11/2010
Localisation: france
Nationalité: Maroc-France
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 12:34

osmali, la délégation est déjà sur place et pour toute l année dans ses pays comme pour la turquie


Revenir en haut Aller en bas
juba2
General de Division
General de Division


messages: 4116
Inscrit le: 02/04/2008
Localisation: USA
Nationalité: MoroccanUS
Médailles de mérite:


MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 22:32

osmali a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:
sorius a écrit:

mais pas ces citoyens marocain santa

Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.

je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?


Yes sir and there are also party at the embassy and around the USA with Moroccan reps with shihiwat bladi. Un citoyen ou citoyenne peut sortir du Maroc mais le Maroc ne sortira jamais de lui ou d'elle,qu'ils (elles) soient musulmans(nes),chretiens(nnes),israelites.,rifi,shleuh,arabe,hassanis,soussi ou n'impotre quoi.

tous les marocains sont fier de leurs pays d'origines
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
tshaashh
Lt-colonel
Lt-colonel


messages: 1305
Inscrit le: 13/12/2010
Localisation: Canada
Nationalité: Maroc
Médailles de mérite:




MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 23:13

juba2 a écrit:
osmali a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:


Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.

je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?


Yes sir and there are also party at the embassy and around the USA with Moroccan reps with shihiwat bladi. Un citoyen ou citoyenne peut sortir du Maroc mais le Maroc ne sortira jamais de lui ou d'elle,qu'ils (elles) soient musulmans(nes),chretiens(nnes),israelites.,rifi,shleuh,arabe,hassanis,soussi ou n'impotre quoi.

tous les marocains sont fier de leurs pays d'origines

Bref, pour reprende en modifiant la blague de Hassan El Fedd "Visit MOROCCO or MOROCCO will visit YOU!" (l'originale etait USA Wink )

_________________
Citation :
One should then look at the world of creation. It started out from the minerals and progressed, in an ingenious, gradual manner, to plants and animals. [...] The animal world then widens, its species become numerous, and, in a gradual process of creation, it finally leads to man, who is able to think and to reflect. The higher stage of man is reached from the world of the monkeys, in which both sagacity and perception are found, but which has not reached the stage of actual reflection and thinking. At this point we come to the first stage of man after (the world of monkeys). This is as far as our (physical) observation extends.


Ibn Khaldoun, Al Mouqaddimah (1377 - Franz Rosenthal translation), Ch.1
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
osmali
Aspirant
Aspirant


messages: 523
Inscrit le: 04/11/2011
Localisation: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti //MENA
Nationalité: Turquie
Médailles de mérite:


MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 23 Avr 2012 - 23:19

tshaashh a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:
osmali a écrit:


je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?


Yes sir and there are also party at the embassy and around the USA with Moroccan reps with shihiwat bladi. Un citoyen ou citoyenne peut sortir du Maroc mais le Maroc ne sortira jamais de lui ou d'elle,qu'ils (elles) soient musulmans(nes),chretiens(nnes),israelites.,rifi,shleuh,arabe,hassanis,soussi ou n'impotre quoi.

tous les marocains sont fier de leurs pays d'origines

Bref, pour reprende en modifiant la blague de Hassan El Fedd "Visit MOROCCO or MOROCCO will visit YOU!" (l'originale etait USA Wink )

je vous félicite !

_________________

"Do you believe a man can change his destiny?"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XogzGNXpRoM
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
sorius
Commandant
Commandant


messages: 1119
Inscrit le: 18/11/2010
Localisation: france
Nationalité: Maroc-France
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Mar 24 Avr 2012 - 0:17

merci c est une constante un marocain est un marocain
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
tshaashh
Lt-colonel
Lt-colonel


messages: 1305
Inscrit le: 13/12/2010
Localisation: Canada
Nationalité: Maroc
Médailles de mérite:




MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Sam 28 Avr 2012 - 3:55

The Canadian Jewish News

http://www.cjnews.com/node/89881

http://www.avephoto.ca/morocco/

Citation :
Photo exhibit is a journey into Jewish Morocco




Aaron Vincent Elkaim’s upcoming photographic exhibit documents the history of Jewish Morocco.

His work will be displayed at the CONTACT Photography Festival for the month of May at the Pikto Gallery in the Distillery District in Toronto.

“The title, A Co-Existence: Lost in the Wake of Zionism, refers to how Jews and Muslims lived alongside each other in relative peace in Morocco since, really, the beginning of Islam,” Elkaim said. “Although an Islamic country, the Jewish People were truly incorporated into the Moroccan identity and structure of the country.”

Although Elkaim said he doesn’t deny certain dark periods in the history, “on the whole, Jews were considered true Moroccans. They were part of the country’s identity, and the country was part of theirs. This is still evident in the nostalgia that exists in those who have left Morocco.”

Elkaim’s photographic project is “a journey into the remnants of a culture” that captures “an epoch of Judaism existing in peace with Islam.” Reviving memories of “a past forgotten in the wake of Zionism,” Elkaim said he aims to tell a story at odds with current perceptions of Jews and Arabs.

The Jewish People arrived in the land now known as Morocco more than 2,000 years ago. Protected since the seventh century by the Islamic principle of tolerance, they thrived, holding high positions in trade and government. The Star of David, which appeared on the currency and national flag, was a symbol all Moroccans shared.

During the Holocaust, when asked for a list of Jews, King Mohammed V declared, “We have no Jews in Morocco, only Moroccan citizens.” In 1940, Morocco had 300,000 Jews, the largest population in the Arab world. Following World War II, Israel’s expansion marked the beginning of an exodus. Today, less than 5,000 Jews remain, Elkaim said.

“The underlying message is simply that coexistence did exist and it worked. I think this is something that is forgotten in today’s political climate, where walls are being built to keep people apart. I feel these walls are blocking the view of what once was and what could be again. I’m simply trying to find hope and truth in history, trying to keep that alive.”

Elkaim said his inspiration for his exhibit stems from his family’s history. “My father was born in the Mellah of Marrakech. He and most of my family immigrated to Canada in the 1960s. They were always very nostalgic of Morocco and kept the culture alive.”

He said the culture was always exotic, yet “normal” for him growing up. “I took it for granted. As I got older though, I began to realize that the culture could not last in the same way as the generations move forward. The Jewish traditions may stay strong, but the cultural tie to Morocco would fade.”

Before becoming a photographer, Elkaim studied cultural anthropology and film in university. He found photography as a passion after completing his degree, but it took a while for him to pursue it as a career.

“For me the idea of exploring the world and its stories and cultures was captivating. When I began to realize that photography offered the ability to keep exploring and learning, I knew I had found something great, but more importantly, it also offered me direction and purpose for these desires. My explorations were no longer just for me – I now had the ability to communicate the things I was discovering. I could tell stories that I believe are important.”

Elkaim said he loves being part of life. “The work I do is a reflection of real life, realities that aren’t my own, but that I am privileged to experience and capture. It is the people and their stories and watching them unfold around me that truly captivate me. It’s less about a beautiful image than capturing what I am experiencing and conveying a feeling about it.”

This year marks the third time that Elkaim is showing his work at CONTACT. He is a founding member of the Boreal Collective, a group of Canadian documentary photographers who had a group show at last year’s festival.

His work from Morocco has also been shown internationally at the Reportage Festival in Australia, the New York Photo Festival, the Recconures des Arles festival in France and Fotographia Festival in Rome.

Elkaim said he hopes people will react positively to his images of Morocco. “I simply aim to shine a light on a history that might have been overlooked in the current framework surrounding both Judaism and Islam. I feel we often see things in black and white, but this story offers us shades of grey, and I believe that truth and hope usually resides somewhere in the middle.”

His favourite image from the collection is of the wind blowing through the curtains of the Al Zama Synagogue in Marrakech. “Everything is blue and so peaceful. You can just feel the presence of a sacred history being preserved within the space.”

To see more of Elkaim’s photography, visit www.avephoto.ca.

God bless.

_________________
Citation :
One should then look at the world of creation. It started out from the minerals and progressed, in an ingenious, gradual manner, to plants and animals. [...] The animal world then widens, its species become numerous, and, in a gradual process of creation, it finally leads to man, who is able to think and to reflect. The higher stage of man is reached from the world of the monkeys, in which both sagacity and perception are found, but which has not reached the stage of actual reflection and thinking. At this point we come to the first stage of man after (the world of monkeys). This is as far as our (physical) observation extends.


Ibn Khaldoun, Al Mouqaddimah (1377 - Franz Rosenthal translation), Ch.1
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
sorius
Commandant
Commandant


messages: 1119
Inscrit le: 18/11/2010
Localisation: france
Nationalité: Maroc-France
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Ven 11 Mai 2012 - 23:41

bonne fêt e hailoula a nos compatriotes
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
tshaashh
Lt-colonel
Lt-colonel


messages: 1305
Inscrit le: 13/12/2010
Localisation: Canada
Nationalité: Maroc
Médailles de mérite:




MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Lun 21 Mai 2012 - 17:34

Citation :

Group brings together Moroccan Muslims and Jews


MONTREAL — For Mahdi Ziani and Jérémie Tapiero, it hasn’t been easy to watch the turbulent fallout of the Arab Spring unfold in Morocco, the country of their common heritage.

The country is in the midst of being caught up in the tides of history, Ziani, a Muslim, and Tapiero, who is Jewish, acknowledge.

Morocco has seen the unsettling rise of Islamism in the form of the Justice and Development Party, which is linked to the Muslim Brotherhood.

In March, David Saranga, an Israeli envoy on a working visit to Morocco’s capital, Rabat, left quickly when tens of thousands protested his presence at a massive pro-Palestinian rally.

Ziani and Tapiero believe those incidents merely underscore the essential need for the fledgling group they are active in, Mémoires & Dialogue.

Launched locally about seven months ago as an outgrowth of informal exchanges that had been taking place among like-minded local Moroccan Muslims and Jews, Mémoires & Dialogue’s terms of reference are to affirm in Quebec – through meetings, conferences and other events – the common and enduring “singular place” Morocco continues to hold in the hearts and minds of its Jews, Muslims, Berber population and other minorities.

“Everyone knows about the problems, but we are together to show how Morocco has, during its history, been a place of tolerance and pluralism for Muslims and Jews,” 34-year-old Ziani, an auditing and training co-ordinator at Concordia University, said in a recent interview.

“The purpose is to reach out, to show that dialogue is possible.”

“We represent all segments of Moroccan society,” noted Tapiero, who, at 36, has worked as a professional in the Jewish community and joined Ziani for the interview. “We are not naïve about what’s going on. But it is also a reason for Mémoires & Dialogues to go on.”

Indeed, both made it clear that while the main purpose of their group is to reinforce common ancestral bonds and to build local bridges of rapprochement and coexistence among Jews, Muslims and others of Moroccan descent, political discussion within Mémoires & Dialogues – whether about religion or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict – is neither avoided nor discouraged.

The group’s French-language website, memoiresetdialogue.com (an English-language link is being worked on), expresses a “cri du coeur” to uphold the Morocco where King Mohammed V refused to impose Vichy laws during World War II, where King Hassan II hosted Shimon Peres and Yasser Arafat for peace talks, and where King Mohammed VI defined the Holocaust as “one of the most painful chapters in human history.”

It also quotes from Morocco’s constitution: “Our Morocco is guided by the values of openness, moderation, tolerance and dialogue for the mutual understanding of all the world’s cultures and civilizations.”

Mémoires & Dialogue’s board of directors therefore includes, in addition to Ziani and Tapiero, a number of other Muslims and Jews, among them president Amine Dabchy, a former president of the Concordia University Student Union; Maurice Chalom, a veteran advisor in the City of Montreal’s police and security department; Rabia Chaouchi, a community development advisor for the City of Montreal; and Elie Benchetrit and Daniel Amar, both well-known figures in the organized Jewish community.

The honorary president is Yehuda Lancry, who was born in Morocco and served as Israel’s ambassador to France and the United Nations.

So far, the group has organized several events, including a “rencontre” with interim Liberal party leader Bob Rae, and an evening of comedy called Tajine de Rires (tajine is a North African stew). Its next major event, called “Canada-Québec-Maroc: questions d’avenir,” is an all-day conference on June 3, with a number of local and international experts, at the Le Sporting Club du Sanctuaire, 6105 Avenue du Boisé.

The event’s honorary co-chairs are Quebec cultural communities minister Kathleen Weil and Morocco’s ambassador to Canada, Nouzha Chekrouni.

For Ziani and Tapiero, the event will mark an ambitious milestone for Mémoires & Dialogues. But both also pointed out the continuing need to “promote the message better,” a task that would be facilitated by more public and corporate involvement and support.

They also said the group plans to eventually take more “specific positions” on “difficult” issues.

“This will be the future,” Tapiero said.

For more information on the June 3 event, call 514-823-5060, or e-mail ­memoiresetdialogue@gmail.com.


Canadian Jewish News

memoiresetdialogue.com


_________________
Citation :
One should then look at the world of creation. It started out from the minerals and progressed, in an ingenious, gradual manner, to plants and animals. [...] The animal world then widens, its species become numerous, and, in a gradual process of creation, it finally leads to man, who is able to think and to reflect. The higher stage of man is reached from the world of the monkeys, in which both sagacity and perception are found, but which has not reached the stage of actual reflection and thinking. At this point we come to the first stage of man after (the world of monkeys). This is as far as our (physical) observation extends.


Ibn Khaldoun, Al Mouqaddimah (1377 - Franz Rosenthal translation), Ch.1
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
tshaashh
Lt-colonel
Lt-colonel


messages: 1305
Inscrit le: 13/12/2010
Localisation: Canada
Nationalité: Maroc
Médailles de mérite:




MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Jeu 14 Juin 2012 - 22:36


Citation :
Festival to celebrate Jewish life in Morocco

TORONTO — An unprecedented Canadian Jewish cultural event under the patronage of the King of Morocco will celebrate 2,000 years of Jewish life in Morocco, as well as 50 years of Canadian-Moroccan diplomatic relations.

The president of the newly established Communaute Juive Marocaine de Toronto (CJMT), Simon Keslassy, said he is thrilled to be joining with Toronto’s Sephardi synagogues to present the weeklong festival, which opens June 4.

Keslassy, who is part of the 18,000-strong Moroccan-Jewish community in Toronto, said Jews have maintained good relations with the largely Muslim country decades after emigrating.

“Morocco is the only country in the Arab world that recognizes Jews as Moroccan citizens,” he said, adding that there are still Toronto Jews from Morocco who collect pensions from their homeland.

“That’s why we have such good relations, and it is the only Arab country that does that… It was also the first country in the Arab world that recognized the Shoah.”

He said King Mohammed VI met with the president of the Jewish community in Morocco last year and pledged to finance the restoration of the old cemeteries when many tzaddikim are buried.

“That’s another reason we’re so grateful,” Keslassy said.

When he was approached by the Moroccan Embassy in Ottawa about organizing an event to celebrate the thriving relationship, Keslassy was eager to do his part.

Throughout the months-long process of organizing and programming the festival, he said he developed a rapport with the Moroccan ambassador in Ottawa, Nouzha Chekrouni.

“She’s a tremendous woman,” he said.

“She told me that she was very excited about the program, and she said she would ask the Royal Palace to put this event under the patronage of the King of Morocco. This is the first time in Moroccan history that in Canada we have a festivity under the patronage of the King of Morocco.”

Keslassy said similar festivals have been held in other cities around the world, including one in New York that was also endorsed by the king.

“This kind of thing has been done in the U.S., in Paris, in Brussels, in London, England, and I was approached by the American Sephardic Federation to see if we would do the same in Canada,” he said.

Keslassy said the aim of the event – which runs from June 4 to 12 and is sponsored by UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, the Canadian Sephardic Federation, Friends of the Simon Weisenthal Center and other private donors – is to educate the younger generations as well as the Ashkenazi Jewish community, about Judeo-Moroccan heritage.

Keslassy said the first event, to be held at the Sephardic Kehila Community Centre on June 4, is an exhibit that will present a traditional Mimouna, a celebration held the day after Passover that marks the return to eating chametz, as well as a lecture by Université du Québec professor David Bensoussan.

“The general community doesn’t know what [Mimouna] is, so we’re inviting the whole community to teach the Ashkenazis and the young generations about our traditions,” Keslassy said.

The following evening marks the opening of an exhibit at York University’s Glendon College featuring Judeo-Moroccan art and artifacts. The exhibit runs until June 28.

Other festival programming includes an exhibit of a traditional Judeo-Moroccan wedding, a youth conference, an interfaith conference, film screenings and a gala dinner to pay tribute to King Mohammed VI, during which the king’s adviser, Andre Azoulay (who is Jewish), will address the gathering.

A student, Elmehdi Boudra, will lead the youth conference and the interfaith conference.

“That young fellow is promoting the Hebrew language in the universities in Morocco. For me, that was a big surprise,” Keslassy said.

“He put together a forum in the university in Ifrane [in the Middle Atlas mountains of Morocco] about the Holocaust, and he brought in survivors from Poland and Germany and this forum was under the patronage of the King of Morocco. We were very happy that the King gave the OK to do this kind of thing in Morocco.”

Keslassy said apart from the gala dinner that closes the weeklong event, all the events, which include cocktail and dessert receptions, are free.

“We did that on purpose so more people will come, will learn about our traditions and give them an opportunity to taste our food,” he said.

“We’re doing this for the young generations, because we have come to the time when the young generation will take over for us and we want them to remember.”

For more information about the festival, visit www.cjmt.org.

The Canadian Jewish News

http://www.cjmt.org/

http://www.americansephardifederation.org/morocco2010.html

_________________
Citation :
One should then look at the world of creation. It started out from the minerals and progressed, in an ingenious, gradual manner, to plants and animals. [...] The animal world then widens, its species become numerous, and, in a gradual process of creation, it finally leads to man, who is able to think and to reflect. The higher stage of man is reached from the world of the monkeys, in which both sagacity and perception are found, but which has not reached the stage of actual reflection and thinking. At this point we come to the first stage of man after (the world of monkeys). This is as far as our (physical) observation extends.


Ibn Khaldoun, Al Mouqaddimah (1377 - Franz Rosenthal translation), Ch.1
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Baybars
general(TSK)
general(TSK)


messages: 6145
Inscrit le: 18/06/2011
Localisation: Moyen-Orient pour toujours
Nationalité: saudi arabia
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Jeu 14 Juin 2012 - 23:00

osmali a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:
sorius a écrit:

mais pas ces citoyens marocain santa

Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.

je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?

Chez nous? Qui?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
osmali
Aspirant
Aspirant


messages: 523
Inscrit le: 04/11/2011
Localisation: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti //MENA
Nationalité: Turquie
Médailles de mérite:


MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Jeu 14 Juin 2012 - 23:27

Baybars a écrit:
osmali a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:


Ils sont comme nous des MRE et ils ont les memes droits.

je vois alors, donc la mére patrie renoue ses relations avec ses fils, on a pas ça chez nous Rolling Eyes dommage.

je présume que le Maroc envoie aussi des délégations en France, Italie, North America tout les 1er choual et 10 thol hijja ?

Chez nous? Qui?

chez nous, les marsiens ! Suspect

_________________

"Do you believe a man can change his destiny?"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XogzGNXpRoM
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Ichkirne
Aspirant
Aspirant


messages: 591
Inscrit le: 19/08/2011
Localisation: Paris
Nationalité: Maroc
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Ven 29 Juin 2012 - 20:39

Citation :
Tinghir-Jérusalem, retour sur images

Ruth Grosrichard

Au moyen de sa caméra, Kamal Hachkar recolle avec finesse les morceaux d'une histoire commune aux juifs et aux musulmans marocains.

Diffusé le 8 avril dernier sur la chaîne marocaine 2M, le documentaire Tinghir-Jérusalem, les échos du Mellah de Kamal Hachkar, n'a laissé personne indifférent. Sur Youtube, cette version pour la télévision (1) ainsi que les extraits divers disponibles auraient été visionnés par des dizaines de milliers d'internautes. Comme on pouvait s'y attendre, il y a les "pour" et les "contre".

Mais ceux qui, par mail ou sur Facebook ont apprécié le film et ont remercié Kamal Hachkar, sont infiniment plus nombreux que les quelques détracteurs qui ont protesté contre sa diffusion, au nom de la lutte contre la normalisation avec Israël. On ne peut que s'en réjouir.

L'intention de ce jeune réalisateur franco-marocain, professeur d'histoire dans la région parisienne, est simple: briser le silence sur la présence juive plurimillénaire dans le royaume, rendre un visage et une voix à cette composante oubliée de l'identité marocaine. Si l'on veut trouver dans son film une prise de position politique et idéologique sur le conflit israélo-palestinien, il faut passer son chemin.

A la recherche du temps perdu

Né à Tinghir, dans la vallée du Todgha, Kamal Hachkar découvre, à l'âge où l'on s'interroge sur soi et les autres, que tous les habitants de son village natal n'ont pas toujours été, comme c'est le cas aujourd'hui, exclusivement musulmans. Il apprend que des communautés juives importantes y ont vécu depuis la nuit des temps et jusqu'au début des années 1960, aux côtés des musulmans. D'où son désir de connaître ce que fut ce passé, et de comprendre pourquoi, du jour au lendemain, ces juifs ont déserté leur terre ancestrale pour aller se transplanter en Israël. Aussi son film est-il construit sur une série de va et vient entre Tinghir et lsraël, permettant de faire dialoguer celles et ceux qui, musulmans comme juifs, ont gardé le souvenir de cette histoire commune.

Dans les ruelles de Tinghir, les plus anciens n'ont pas oublié la tranche de vie qu'ils ont partagée avec les juifs. Baha, le grand-père du réalisateur, lui fait visiter ce qui reste du mellah (quartier juif): ici des maisons ; là une ancienne synagogue ; plus loin, la kissaria (caravansérail) : "tous ces commerces appartenaient aux juifs...on se connaissait bien, on buvait du thé, on jouait aux cartes et on discutait de tout", se souvient l'aïeul. Témoin de cette proximité disparue, un vieil artisan fredonne un couplet chanté autrefois par les femmes juives de Tinghir, et décrit en le mimant le rituel observé par les hommes lors des prières. Un autre, aux airs de patriarche, raconte que les deux communautés étaient unies du temps des guerre tribales et conclut : "il y avait une grande solidarité et un grand respect entre nous. On était des frères".

Vision idéalisée construite a posteriori ? Non, car à des milliers de kilomètres de là, dans une de ces villes israéliennes de développement, sans aucun caractère, Hannah et son amie déclarent à l'unisson être "marocaines et berbères à 100%". Nostalgiques, elles évoquent - en arabe et en berbère - cette coexistence qui n'a commencé à faire problème qu'à partir de 1948, avec la création de l'Etat d'Israël : "on ne nous disait plus bonjour, mais personne ne nous a fait du mal et ne nous a dit de partir".

L'histoire du Maroc nous enseigne que, en dépit de périodes douloureuses pour les juifs, la coexistence intercommunautaire fut effective, enracinant chez les uns et les autres le sentiment d'une même appartenance marocaine. Pourtant une sorte de séisme s'est produit, qui devait les séparer dans l'espace et dans le temps. Zeavah, partie de Tinghir à 11 ans, en témoigne : "le jour du départ, j'ai beaucoup pleuré, ma mère et la femme musulmane qui travaillait chez nous ont beaucoup pleuré... Je savais que c'était fini. En une nuit, on a tout laissé, on est parti avec deux valises".

Mais pourquoi ces départs ? Interrogé par Kamal Hachkar, Yossef Chétrit - historien originaire de Taroudant - répond : les juifs marocains, profondément croyants et attachés à leur foi, ont obéi à ce qui était pour eux un appel messianique au retour en Terre promise. En somme, la motivation religieuse aurait été plus déterminante que l'adhésion au sionisme politique européen, étranger à leur vécu. L'explication est juste mais partielle. On ne reprochera pas au réalisateur d'omettre les raisons complexes, qui ont conduit à cet exode brutal : ce n'est pas son objectif. Son film a déjà le grand mérite de porter à l'écran quelques aspects d'une question occultée. Deux autres cinéastes marocains, Hassan Benjelloun (Où vas-tu Moché ?) et Mohamed Ismaïl (Adieu Mères) l'avaient fait avant lui, sur un mode très différent.

En fait, les raisons d'un tel exode, dont les temps forts se situent entre 1948 et les années 1960, sont aussi politiques, économiques et sociales. Quant aux responsables, ils sont plusieurs, à des degrés divers : organisations sionistes et autorités françaises du protectorat, nationalistes zélés et responsables politiques marocains. Dans ce contexte tendu et incertain pour elle, la communauté juive s'en est trouvée fragilisée. Du coup, elle sera réceptive au "vous êtes en danger" et à la promesse d'un avenir meilleur que diffusaient des émissaires de l'HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society), notamment auprès des plus démunis. David, ancien instituteur dans la région de Tinghir, relate la mission qu'on lui avait confiée : "on m'avait demandé de faire partir les juifs de tous les villages. On les inscrivait, on leur faisait des passeports que le ministère de l'Intérieur acceptait alors que nous les établissions nous même". A la question : "Le Maroc aurait-il vendu ses juifs ?", David répond, hésitant et gêné : "Un peu".

D'un exil à l'autre

Les juifs marocains par dizaines de milliers ont donc mis fin à leur exil biblique, tentés aussi par les jours heureux qu'on leur avait fait miroiter. La vérité, c'est qu'ils ont connu un nouvel exil. Double cette fois. Le premier exil les a condamnés à des conditions de vie très précaires. Dans un livre aussi bref que fort (2), Ella Shohat, née en Israël de parents juifs irakiens, rappelle que les "juifs orientaux" (ceux des pays arabes) ont été placés, à leur arrivée, sous la férule de fonctionnaires ashkénazes (3), autoritaires et arrogants, qui les regroupèrent dans des baraques en tôle ondulée ou des villages reculés. Elle met en cause le sionisme qui - prétendant offrir un foyer national à tous les juifs - ne l'a pas ouvert à tous avec la même générosité et a toujours privilégié les juifs d'Europe au détriment des juifs orientaux. A quoi fait écho, dans Tinghir-Jérusalem, cette complainte composée en arabe et chantée par Hannah :

"Je suis allée au bureau du travail, je lui ai dit " je viens du Maroc, il m'a dit de sortir " / Je suis allée au bureau du travail, je lui ai dit " je viens de Pologne, il m'a dit : entre et assieds-toi s'il te plaît"/ L'employée de Ben Gourion m'a dit qu'elle me donnerait un logement bon marché/ Elle m'a logée sous une tente et m'oblige à vivre dans la honte".

Le second exil vécu par les juifs orientaux est d'ordre culturel. Ils sont tenus en piètre estime par l'establishment ashkénaze qui n'a pas de mots assez méprisants pour les désigner et qualifier leurs langues et leurs cultures. Le 22 avril 1949, Arie Gelblum écrivait dans le quotidien Haaretz : "Le primitivisme de ces gens est insurpassable... ils ne sont guère plus évolués que les Arabes, les nègres et les Berbères de leurs pays". Ben Gourion (4), s'exprimant à la Knesset, traitait les juifs marocains de "sauvages". Quant à Golda Meir (5), elle s'interrogeait : "saurons-nous élever ces immigrés à un niveau de civilisation satisfaisant ?"

Cette attitude des autorités sionistes, érigée en politique, aura produit l'effet inverse de ce qu'elle prétendait combattre. Elle aura renforcé l'attachement de nombreux juifs marocains - nés ou non au Maroc - à leurs langues et à leurs traditions. Evoquant, devant la caméra de Kamal Hachkar, le dénigrement dont a été l'objet la culture marocaine, le célèbre chanteur Shlomo Bar, né à Rabat en 1943, se fait l'interprète de cette marocanité revendiquée, dans sa chanson Kfar Todgha en particulier. Récit de l'apprentissage de la Torah par les enfants de Tinghir, ce tube serait devenu, en Israël, un sorte d'hymne à la fierté d'être marocain.

Tinghir-Jérusalem donne donc aussi à voir et à entendre la désillusion et la souffrance de ces juifs marocains face à l'injustice dont ils ont été victimes, eux aussi, de la part du projet sioniste. On comprend mal alors que des esprits chagrins se soient élevés, au Maroc, contre la diffusion de ce film et n'aient pas su ou voulu en apprécier les véritables qualités.
___________________________

(1) L'auteur de cet article a vu la version longue, pour les salles de cinéma (86mn), produite et diffusée par Les films d'un jour : assistant.distribution@filmsdunjour.com.

(2) Le sionisme du point de vue de ses victimes juives, les juifs orientaux en Israël, La fabrique éditions, Paris, 2006.

(3) juifs d'Allemagne, de Pologne, Russie et, plus généralement, d'Europe centrale et orientale

Né en 1886 en Pologne, il est "le fondateur" de l'Etat d'Israël et Premier ministre de 1948 à 1953 puis de 1955 à 1963.

(5) Née en Ukraine en 1898, elle a compté parmi les pionniers de la création d'Israël et fut Premier ministre avant d'occuper divers autres postes ministériels.

http://www.huffingtonpost.fr/ruth-grosrichard/tinghir-jerusalem-retour-sur-images_b_1634648.html?utm_hp_ref=international
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Yakuza
Administrateur
Administrateur


messages: 19881
Inscrit le: 15/09/2009
Localisation: 511
Nationalité: Maroco-Allemand
Médailles de mérite:



MessageSujet: Re: Culture judéo-marocaine   Dim 22 Juil 2012 - 20:39

Citation :
Wandering Jew: Morocco and Berber Jews
By TANYA POWELL-JONES
07/22/2012 15:22
From the mountains to the back alleys, Marrakesh is filled with rich Jewish history.



Even with only a day to explore, Marrakesh has a lot to offer the traveler looking to delve into the city’s rich Jewish history. From the former Jewish quarter, which can be found in the back alleys of the City, to the high mountains where the last remaining Berber Jew lives, there is never a dull moment. Although eating kosher will prove tricky this is not impossible and the famed Marrakesh square is brimming with Eastern delights.

The Mellah, east of the Medina (old city) is the former Jewish quarter of Marrakesh. In the 16th century, sultan Abdullah Al-Ghalib moved the Jews here for protection. The quarter was once a town in itself with synagogues, shops and markets. Today, the remnants of the quarter’s Jewish past remain while most of the inhabitants are now Muslim.

Finding The Mellah, known as the Hay Essalam, is not particularly easy. Situated east of the Medina and with street names being almost non-existent, the many paths can get confusing. The best way to enter is through the Place des Ferblantiers or Place de Mellah. To find the center of the quarters, look for a fountain and the tin workers on the outside of the square market. At this point you will have likely caught the attention of some young locals who will undoubtedly try to get you to hire them as tour guides. If you do this then be prepared to pay a few dirhams several times because they swap guides along the way. This shouldn’t amount to more than a few dollars in total.



As you enter The Mellah and walk through the narrow quarter you’ll notice that many of the houses are built below street level and have mezuzahs on them. Inside the Mellah is the Lazama synagogue, which was built in the 15th century by the Jews that fled Spain after the inquisition. It’s located down a long uninviting alley and the entrance is an unmarked door. Don’t let this put you off. As you enter you will find yourself in a world of striking blue and white walls that surround a well cared for courtyard.

On the bottom floor is the synagogue where you will need to make a small donation to go inside. On the floor above there is a soup kitchen, a community center and a Talmud Torah School. The building was built with the purpose of preserving the Spanish methods of Jewish observation. However, over the years, the different communities have integrated and such distinctions have been blurred.

Leaving the synagogue and heading straight through the alley you are only a few minutes away from the still active Miara Jewish cemetery. This is Morocco’s largest Jewish cemetery that dates back to the 16th century. The actual graveyard is separated into three sections, one for men, one for women and one for children. The cemetery is quite vast with bright white graves and you will be expected to make a donation to enter it. To get there you may want to pay the young locals a few dirham considering it’s a bit tricky to find.



The kosher choices for lunch are pretty limited with the restaurant at Hotel Riad Primavera being the only real option. You can find the restaurant outside the old city, just off of AllalFassi Avenue, near the Marjane department store. For non-kosher options, go to the famed square, Djemaa el-Fna. This is only a ten-minute walk from The Mellah and there are a number of outdoor places to get lunch. A popular choice is Les Jardins de la Medina on 21 Rue DerbChtouka. It serves traditional and French cuisine on a terrace. Prices range from 180 dirham to 360. Getting there takes just a few minutes from the main square by going via the Kasbah quarter close to the Royal Palace.

For the afternoon you can visit one of the most pristine valleys in Morocco, Ourika Valley. Tucked away in the Atlas Mountains, it’s only 30km from Marrakesh and takes around 1-2 hours to get there by bus.

Located in the Ourika Valley is the ancient town of Aghbalou. Here you will find the 500-year-old tomb of a former Chief Rabbi of Marrakesh, Solomon Bel-Hench, which rests on the edge of a mountain above a river. One particular trait of Moroccan Judaism is the honor of holy men, and Rabbi Shlomo is one of the most revered Jewish saints in Morocco. Hananiyah Alfassi, one of the few remaining Berber Jews of the Valley, has faithfully guarded his tomb for over 30 years. Whilst here you can visit him and the tomb as well as take in the general scenery. You can also walk around the many herb gardens and have some traditional mint tea Berber style before heading back to Marrakesh.

Once back in Marrakesh, make your way to the Djemaa El Fna Square for the evening. At night it comes alive as snake charmers, storytellers and monkey owners take over the square. If you want a kosher dinner then head back to Riad Primavera. A non-kosher choice is the Narwama restaurant on Rue Koutoubia 30. To get to the restaurant go to the corner of the square and look down the side road where you will see a sign on a black post. Don’t be put off by walking down the alley. Once you’re through the red curtain you’ll enter a former UNESCO World Heritage building that has a central courtyard with a fountain of flames and water. They serve Thai, Mediterranean and Moroccan food and the average cost is 370 dirham.

The Jewish Virtual Library contributed to this report.
http://www.jpost.com/Travel/TravelNews/Article.aspx?id=278459

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 

Culture judéo-marocaine

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 15 sur 18Aller à la page : Précédent  1 ... 9 ... 14, 15, 16, 17, 18  Suivant

 Sujets similaires

-
» Hommage à Kateb Yacine à la maison de la culture de Setif avec Amazigh ( photos)
» Se marier avec une Quebecoise ou une Marocaine???
» master culture de l'ecrit et de l'image Lyon II
» Blague marocaine
» Iut bordeaux questionnaire de culture G juin 2009

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Royal Moroccan Armed Forces :: Diversités :: Infos et Nouvelles Nationales-