Royal Moroccan Armed Forces


 
AccueilS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 F/A 18 Hornet around the world

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4
AuteurMessage
rafi
General de Division
General de Division


messages : 8554
Inscrit le : 23/09/2007
Localisation : le monde
Nationalité : Luxemburg
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 7 Aoû 2013 - 16:56

Ça va donner de l'allonge à cet avion qui a un rayon d'action pas vraiment extraordinaire pour un avion embarqué. L'intégration de ces CFT semble particulièrement bien réussie...

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Yakuza
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

messages : 21633
Inscrit le : 15/09/2009
Localisation : 511
Nationalité : Maroco-Allemand
Médailles de mérite :

MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 7 Aoû 2013 - 18:22

beau bebé,je me demande qui pourrait etre interessé par ce road-map
avec l´IRST ca ressemble au tomcat

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Alloudi
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 6636
Inscrit le : 11/10/2008
Localisation : morocco
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :


MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 7 Aoû 2013 - 22:06

magnifique comment les US redonne vie a leur avions drunken 

_________________
Gloire à nos aieux  
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Chobham
Capitaine
Capitaine


messages : 869
Inscrit le : 12/04/2012
Localisation : Rabat
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :


MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Jeu 8 Aoû 2013 - 0:52

Deja que sa manœuvrabilité n'est pas très fameuse, et avec le drag engendré par les CTF ça ne ferra qu'empirer ... J'aimerai bien ce qu'en penserons les pilotes de Super Hornet
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Fremo
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

messages : 21556
Inscrit le : 14/02/2009
Localisation : 7Seas
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 28 Aoû 2013 - 12:38


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 28 Aoû 2013 - 13:35

  avec CFT
Citation :
Boeing to demonstrate advanced multi-aircraft data fusion in 2014



Boeing, in co-operation with the US Navy, is hoping to demonstrate seamlessly fusing data from multiple, different aircraft using multiple, different sensors in real time in the air in 2014, a senior company official says.



Boeing

The "multi-ship/multi-spectral fusion demonstration" would see Northrop Grumman's E-2D Hawkeye airborne early warning aircraft link to Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets equipped with Raytheon APG-79 active electronically scanned array radars and a Lockheed Martin-built infrared search and track system to form a common operating picture, says Paul Summers, Boeing's director of Super Hornet and EA-18G programmes.

The aircraft are expected to share data via an advanced tactical datalink to effectively eliminate von Clausewitz's "fog of war", Summers says. Exponentially increased situational awareness should greatly expand air-to-air engagement ranges.



Boeing

Boeing is planning to use Rockwell Collin's Tactical Targeting Network Technology (TTNT) waveform for the demonstration. The TTNT waveform has found favour within the USN because it has much greater throughput over greater ranges than the existing Link-16 datalink.

Summers says that the demonstration will likely be held on the east coast Patuxent River, Maryland.

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Ven 29 Nov 2013 - 15:54

Citation :
KONGSBERG and Boeing complete Joint Strike Missile (JSM) Check on F/A-18 Super Hornet
29.11.2013

Kongsberg Defence Systems (KONGSBERG) and Boeing recently completed a successful fit-check of the Joint Strike Missile (JSM) on an F/A-18F Super Hornet at the Boeing St. Louis facility to ensure the weapons fit on the aircraft’s external pylons. The test brings the JSM one step closer to Super Hornet compatibility.

- The Joint Strike Missile (JSM) is a 5th generation long-range stealthy precision strike missile for sea- and land targets. Boeings F-18E/F multirole fighter is one of the most capable and successful international fighter platforms. KONGSBERG is proud to work with Boeing to offer JSM capability on F-18. The completion of the fit-check on F/A-18 F further validates the JSM compatibility with existing fleet of aircraft and provides a near term strong capability against advanced threats, says Harald Ånnestad, President Kongsberg Defence Systems.

KONGSBERG and Boeing plan to conduct wind tunnel testing for the Block II Super Hornet early next year.
http://www.kongsberg.com

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Lun 3 Mar 2014 - 10:55

Citation :
Boeing may slow F/A-18 plane output to keep line going longer


(Reuters) - Boeing Co is considering a slower build rate and other options to keep production of its EA-18G electronic attack planes running into 2017, and give Congress time to add more orders, a top company executive told Reuters in an interview.

The St. Louis production line for Boeing's F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and EA-18G Growlers is slated to shut down after 2016 unless the Pentagon's No. 2 supplier wins additional U.S. or foreign orders for the planes soon. The plant will build F-15 fighters through at least 2018, based on current orders.

U.S. Navy officials often laud the performance, on-time deliveries, and low operating cost of the Super Hornet and Growler aircraft, which fly from U.S. aircraft carriers.

But U.S. defense officials say the Pentagon's 2015 budget will not fund any more of the Boeing planes given competing budget demands and a growing focus on Lockheed Martin Corp's next-generation F-35 fighter, which has three models, including a carrier-based model for the Navy.

Boeing executives acknowledge the tough budget environment, but say detailed studies under way by the U.S. military reveal a need for more electronic attack aircraft given work by potential adversaries on new radar systems that could detect F-22 fighters and other stealthy planes like the F-35.

The EA-18G Growlers fly into battle with other warplanes, jamming, confusing and disrupting enemy radars. Other aircraft have some electronic capabilities, but Boeing says the Growler is the only plane that addresses the full spectrum of threats.

"Boeing is looking for creative ways to partner with the Navy, including lowering the rate to two aircraft per month, to keep the line running past 2016," Mike Gibbons, vice president of F/A-18 and EA-18 programs, said in a telephone interview late on Friday. Restarting the line later would be costly.

The company already plans to slow production to three jets a month from four, but scaling it back further to two jets could extend the production line through mid-2017, without substantially raising the price, he said.

"We want to keep the opportunity open so that Congress can act," he said. "It's pretty clear that there's an emerging realization of the need for more Growlers ... not just for the Navy, but the Air Force and the Marines."

He said the Navy and the Pentagon's Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation office were "very seriously" studying the need for more electronic attack capability, and Boeing could eventually land 50 to 100 more Growler orders.

Even though a possible shutdown is still years away, Boeing must decide within a month whether to use its own funds to keep certain suppliers producing titanium and other items that take longer to produce, or to start shutting down the line.

Congress added $75 million in "long lead funding" for 22 more Growlers to the Pentagon's fiscal 2014 defense budget, but the Navy has not yet released those funds.

Gibbons said the Navy had shown a "very strong willingness" to accept slower delivery of jets if that kept the line running beyond 2016, but no decisions had been made. If agreed, the slower build rate could be factored into a multibillion dollar contract for 47 jets that Gibbons said he expected to finish negotiating with the Navy over the next month or two.

Some U.S. lawmakers worry about ending the Boeing production line in 2016, three years before the Navy is due to start using its F-35 jets in combat, especially given continued issues with the development of software that the F-35 fighter needs to be able to operate certain key weapons.

Representative Randy Forbes, a member of the House Armed Services Committee, told Reuters he is pressing the Navy to explain its reasoning for shutting the line. "I'm really concerned," he said. "If we need them later, you can't rebuild all that production capacity."

Pentagon officials argue that the $392 billion F-35 program is making progress after years of delays and cost overruns. They say the new jet's electronic warfare and data fusion technology will be vital to fight future potential adversaries.

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations Vice Admiral Joseph Mulloy last week said the Navy remained committed to the F-35 program, and had no plans to extend the Super Hornet/Growler line.

But others say the Navy remains skeptical about the carrier variant of the F-35, which is due to start sea trials this summer. The Navy plans to defer orders for four F-35s in fiscal 2015, and a total of 33 jets over the five-year planning period that runs through fiscal 2019, said one source familiar with the plans.

Congressional aides say lawmakers may be hard-pressed to fund extra Growlers given competing demands at a time when the Pentagon is targeting military pay and other systems.

Gibbons said budget pressures strengthened Boeing's push for more Growlers since the jet offered what he called an "incredibly affordable and agile weapons system for the future."

The company says it also sees possible orders from two buyers in the Middle East, which plan to decide by the end of 2014, as well as Canada, Denmark and Malaysia.

Canada helped fund the development of the F-35 and had planned to buy the plane, but is now considering a fresh competition given problems with the initial F-35 selection. Denmark is launching a competition this year.

Richard Aboulafia, analyst with the Virginia-based Teal Group, said moves to slow production of the jets could help extend the line for a while, but he was skeptical about the likelihood of more foreign orders.

"They've been on the international campaign trail for 20 years and there's been exactly one customer -- Australia. There just isn't a lot of demand for heavier twin-engine fighters."

(Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Rosalind Russell)

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jonas
General de Brigade
General de Brigade
avatar

messages : 3325
Inscrit le : 11/02/2008
Localisation : far-maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :

MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mar 10 Juin 2014 - 19:48

a écrit:

Le Super Hornet, l’avion qui pourrait sauver l’Amérique

Il n’est pas besoin de prendre beaucoup de hauteur pour s’apercevoir que l’état de l’aviation de combat des États-Unis est en train de péricliter. Les avions avancent en âge, leur remplaçant est en retard, et la situation n’est pas en voie de s’améliorer. Des trois corps combattants qui utilisent une aviation de combat (USAF/USMC), l’US Navy semblent la mieux lotie. Elle est la première à avoir engagée le remplacement de ses avions après l’abandon du programme A-12, avec un appareil moins moderne que le futur F-35 certes, mais opérationnel et éprouvé : le F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. Un appareil qui a rarement été sous le feu des projecteurs, mais qui potentiellement pourrait devenir le sauveur des USA !

Une genèse à l’ombre de grands noms.

Le Super Hornet n’est pas à proprement parler d’un avion nouveau, surtout lorsque l’on étudie sa genèse. Il pourrait être facilement considéré comme étant au sommet d’une évolution de plusieurs générations d’appareils ayant rencontré le succès, mais toujours dans l’ombre de « guest stars ». Son origine remonte à des travaux menés par Northrop pour revoir le design du F-5, ce qui mena au projet N-300, puis P-350. C’est en répondant à un appel d’offres, le Lightweight Fighter (LWF) visant à étudier la faisabilité d’un avion de combat léger avec un cours préavis et très peu de moyens (tout est relatif aux USA…) que Northrop proposa son design, qui sera sélectionné avec celui de Genaral Dynamics, chacun devant fabriquer un démonstrateur technologique : Le YF-17 pour Northrop, et le YF-16 pour général Dynamics.
La suite de l’histoire est connue. L’USAF sera pratiquement obligée de commander un des deux appareils, alors qu’elle ne jurait que par son nouveau jouet ultra Hight tech et deux fois plus lourd, le F-15 Eagle. Le vainqueur de la compétition sera donc le F-16, avion qui rencontra, grâce à quelques coups du sort, un succès qui ne sera certainement plus jamais égalé. (voir ici un résumé de l'histoire du F-16)

De son côté, l’US Navy fut encouragée à regarder de plus près les résultats du programme LWF, elle qui cherchait à trouver un avion complémentaire, et moins onéreux que le F-14. La Marine Américaine lancera alors le Navy Air Combat Fighter (NACF). C’est le concept de Northrop qui sera sélectionné, et l’avion deviendra le F/A-18 Hornet, le cheval de bataille de l’US Navy durant des décennies. Léger, maniable, le Hornet avait pour lui d’être surtout incroyablement polyvalent. De tous les chasseurs US, c’est l’avion qui est capable d’emporter la palette d’armement la plus complète, du missile air-air courte portée Sidewinder, ou moyenne portée Aim-120 Amraam jusqu’à la bombe nucléaire B-61, en passant par presque toutes les munitions air-sol guidées ou non, propulsées ou non de l’inventaire de l’armée américaine. Dassault Aviation se serait d’ailleurs largement inspiré de la réussite de ce concept pour l’adapter sur son nouvel avion, dans une version encore améliorée, avec le Rafale « Omnirôle ».
À la demande de la Navy, Mc Donnel Douglas s’associera à Northrop pour développer l’avion.

La naissance du « Rhino »

Quelques années après le succès du F-18 Hornet, l’US Navy réfléchi déjà, à la fin des années 80, à remplacer ses avions d’attaque A-6 Intruder et A-7 Corsair II. Elle s’était lancée pour cela dans un très ambitieux programme d’avion de combat « furtif », le A-12. Le programme ne survivra pas aux conséquences de la chute du mur de Berlin, et les ambitions de la Navy seront rabaissées d’un cran, surtout que le temps investi dans l’A-12 est désormais perdu. McDonnell Douglas proposa quelque temps auparavant une version plus grande et plus lourde du F/A-18, le Hornet 2000. En attente de décisions sur deux autres types d’appareils bien plus évolués. D’abord dénommé Hornet II, puis Super Hornet, l’avion sera largement revu, avec à la clé une autonomie, capacité d’emport et capacités de combat largement améliorées. Tout ou presque sera refait en se basant sur des acquis. Véritable programme empirique, l’avion n’affiche pas des performances extraordinaires, mais il est prévu pour faire le job, en tant qu’intérimaire. Au terme des jeux de fusion entre les nombreux constructeurs américains, c’est désormais Boeing qui est l’entreprise produisant le F/A-18 E/F.


Avec un peu plus de 1 000 exemplaires produits, le Hornet connu également un certain succès à l'export. Ici, un C-15, désignation locale du F-18 Espagnol.

Le Super Hornet, un choix pragmatique

Au début des années 90, c’est la course aux avions de nouvelle génération. La folie vient de la doctrine de la furtivité. Concevoir un appareil invisible aux Radars adverses est un rêve un peu fou caressé par bien des généraux.
C’est ainsi que le remplaçant du célébrissime F-14 Tomcat, capable de protéger la flotte américaine à très longue distance est attendu avec un dérivé du programme F-22 de l’USAF. La Navy va également se joindre aux comités de réflexion naissant concernant un avion de combat, conçu collectivement avec le corps des Marines et de l’armée de l’air américaine, le futur F-35.
Ces deux programmes vont connaitre des problèmes de développement, à des niveaux rarement rencontrés jusque-là pour des programmes qui seront menés à leur terme. Des rêves de grandeur, les États-Unis (comme beaucoup de pays) en ont eu beaucoup, mais jusqu’à présent, les moins raisonnables ont toujours été annulés, comme le programme d’intercepteur basé sur le SR-71 Blackbird et le XB-70 Walkirye de l’US Air Force, le RAH-66 Comanche de l’US Army ou le A-12 Avenger II de l’US Navy.
La recherche d’une discrétion électromagnétique très avancée étant problématique sur de nombreux points (vitesse, manœuvrabilité, masse) les budgets de recherche et développement sont colossaux et prennent beaucoup de temps.
Le Super Hornet, prévu pour être un trait d’union entre le départ des A-6, A-7 et F-14 et l’arrivée des avions de nouvelle génération, s’avèrera au final être un atout extrêmement précieux pour la préservation des capacités de combat de l’US Navy. Pour le comprendre, il suffit de comparer l’état de la flotte des avions de combat de la Marine à celles de l’USMC et surtout, de l’USAF.

Avions de nouvelle génération, des programmes vampiriques !

De tous les qualificatifs, le terme de vampirisme parait tout à fait approprié. Il faut s’imaginer que les programmes F-22 et F-35, dont Boeing a été à chaque fois un malheureux concurrent, sont véritablement des suceurs de substance essentielle à la survie de l’armée, le dollar. Inutile de rappeler à quel point ces programmes sont des trous dans les poches du pentagone, mais il existe un effet bien plus pervers, la perte de capacité de combat à court et moyen terme de l’USMC et de l’USAF.
Qu’un programme soit cher, soit. Mais combiné à un retard trop important, les conséquences sont catastrophiques. Regardez le graphique suivant, il parle de lui-même.




L’industrialisation du F-22 Raptor ayant été stoppée prématurément pour privilégier le programme F-35 (sic !), et en considérant que le F-35A ne sera pas véritablement opérationnel avant 2025 (certains prédisent même 2030), l’USAF va se retrouver à gérer une flotte d’avion de combat dont les dernières grandes séries lui auront été livrées au début des années 1990 !
Est-ce imaginable ? Oui. En modernisant les avions actuellement en service et en augmentant leur potentiel cellule, l’US Air Force devrait pouvoir réussir ce tour de force.
Mais c’est sans compter sur les effets des baisses de budget qui contraignent le Dod à faire des choix drastiques. C’est ainsi que la modernisation de plusieurs centaines de F-16 a été mainte fois repoussée, et que l’USAF proposera même de mettre à la retraite l’ensemble de ses A-10 Thunderbolt II !
En résumant et en simplifiant à l’extrême : à cause du retard des avions de nouvelle génération, l'USAF retarde la modernisation de ces avions en service. Cela semble-t-il logique ? Mais puisque le programme F-35 accumule encore aujourd'hui de nouveaux dépassements de calendrier, l’armée de l’air sera bien obligée d’engager cette modernisation, qui sera loin d’être gratuite.
Les retards du F-35 ont donc des répercussions économiques bien plus graves que celles liées directement au surcoût du développement du programme, et des conséquences sur la capacité de l’armée américaine à déployer des avions de combat dans des zones de conflits.


Histoire d’amour compliquée entre la Navy et le F-35C

Loin de la folie des grandeurs des « fifth generation aircraft », le Super Hornet permet aujourd’hui à l’US-Navy de disposer d’une aviation de combat jeune et pleinement opérationnel. Les capacités de l’avion ne sont plus à démontrer, et bien que l’US Navy souhaite en acquérir davantage, cela lui est refusé par le pentagone. Celui-ci craint en effet que si la Marine engage la construction de Super Hornet supplémentaire, elle réduira sa cible de commande de F-35, pénalisant encore un peu plus l’ensemble du programme.
Et la crainte est fondée. La gronde de certains amiraux est palpable. Premièrement, la formule générale de l’avion ne leur convient pas. Ce sera le premier monomoteur à opérer sur porte-avion depuis le retrait des A-7 Corsair II. Avec les exigences liées aux opérations aéronavales, la structure du F-35C par rapport à la version A a dû être renforcée, donc alourdie. Et pour réduire la vitesse d’approche, l’envergure a été augmentée, rajoutant encore à la masse de l’avion. Le F-35C, avec une charge alaire réduite sera potentiellement le plus manœuvrant des trois, mais avec un rapport Puissance/poids bien inférieur aux autres avions, et des performances cinétiques bien inférieures.

En plus des problèmes liés à la formule aérodynamique imposée par le choix d’un avion commun aux trois armées, les bourdes de conception et les errements du développement ne semblent plus avoir de limite, et semblent échapper à tout raisonnement logique. Pour preuve, le défaut lié à l’emplacement de la crosse d’appontage qui empêche à l’avion d’accrocher un brin d’arrêt (voir cet article: Pourquoi le F-35C ne peut apponter?)
Il aura fallu 16 mois au Super Hornet depuis son tout premier vol pour être capable d’apponter (nov. 95-mars 97), et une période similaire au Rafale pour faire de même (déc91 – avr. 93). Le F-35A a volé pour la première fois en 2006, mais la version navale n’a pris les airs qu’en décembre 2006. À ce jour, la version marine du F-35 n’a toujours pas apponté ; un solution aurait été trouvée (mais pas détaillée) et des essais doivent avoir lieu en mer à partir du mois d’octobre 2014. Si tout se déroule bien, le premier appontage du F-35C aura eu lieu 52 mois après son premier vol, et aura nécessité plus de trois fois le temps qu’il en aura fallu à Dassault Aviation et Boeing durant les essais en vol de leurs appareils respectifs!
Et nous ne parlons là que de mise au point de la cellule… La mise au point des systèmes en étant pour sa part à ses débuts, les capacités de combat de l’avion données par l’ensemble de ses logiciels restent encore à inventer.


Un F/A-18 F Super Hornet volant dans l'aile d'un F-35-C. Seule l'histoire nous dira si l'un sera le successeur, ou le concurrent de l'autre.

Le Super Hornet, l’avion du salut

Boeing est le seul constructeur américain à posséder la capacité de fournir des avions de combat opérationnels avec le F-15 et le Super Hornet, qui sont encore en production, mais pour peu de temps (voir cet article). Des deux, le Super Hornet est l’avion le plus avancé. Le constructeur a même dans ses cartons un projet d’Advanced Super Hornet qui rajoutera à l’appareil une caractéristique commune aux avions de nouvelle génération qui lui fait cruellement défaut : la fusion de données (caractéristique présente sur le F-35, Rafale, Eurofighter, mais pas sur le Raptor – nous y reviendrons dans un prochain article).
En plus de cette avancée majeure restant encore à développer, Boeing a conçu des réservoirs conformes de fuselage qui se plaquent sur l’extrados de l’avion, augmentant ainsi son rayon d’action, mais aussi des soutes à armement externe permettant de réduire significativement la surface équivalente de l’avion.
Le Super Hornet est donc un avion possédant un bon potentiel d’évolution, et qui possède une caractéristique qui est unique : le programme n’a connu aucun dépassement de coût ni aucun retard ! De plus, son prix est équivalent au tiers seulement du coût de production du F-35 actuellement.
Avec ces arguments, pourquoi le Super Hornet, ou sa version évoluée, l’Advanced Super Hornet ne serait-il pas proposée comme une solution à tous les problèmes de l’US Air Force ? Jusqu’à quel point le pentagone sera-t-il prêt à s’investir à perte dans un programme qui semble voué à l’échec ? La question mérite d’être posée.

http://portail-aviation.blogspot.fr/

_________________
" les orphelins d'aujourd'hui seront les guerriers de demain !!! " GAZA
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Jeu 26 Juin 2014 - 10:26

Citation :
Boeing plots hybrid Super Hornet/Growler future


Boeing is formulating a concept for a hybrid variant of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet equipped with the electronic signal detection capabilities of the EA-18G Growler as it seeks to attract orders for new aircraft and upgrades to older models.

The resulting aircraft would resemble an E/A-18G that lacks ALQ-99 jamming pods for electronic attack, preserves the ALQ-218 electronic receiver and adds weapons now only carried by the F/A-18E/F, says Boeing vice-president Mike Gibbons.

“That hybrid just starts with the simple notion of take the sensor suite of the Growler and move it to a basically strike platform and then you grow that platform to take advantage of the fact that you can now see anybody that’s emitting,” Gibbons says.

The growth capabilities would be the addition of a long-range infrared search and track sensor and new air-to-air tracking modes for airborne systems.

Gibbons has recently taken charge of Boeing’s F-15 but previously led the F/A-18E/F and EA-18G programmes.

As Gibbons briefed a group of reporters on both programmes in St. Louis, Missouri on 24 June, the hybrid Super Hornet/Growler concept emerged as he explained why Boeing is so confident that it can extend production of the combined production line for several years despite the current backlog running out at the end of 2016.

Last October, the US Navy prematurely released a draft solicitation document to buy up to 36 more E/A-18Gs, then withdrew the document after it gained attention. Instead, the USN tacked an order for 22 more E/A-18G onto the top of a wish list of unfunded priorities sent to Congress for Fiscal 2015. Congress has met the navy’s request half-way, with the House of Representatives adding 12 E/A-18Gs to next year’s appropriations bill. The Senate has yet to move on its version of the budget bill.

If the House version prevails, the added 12 E/A-18Gs would be combined with previous orders to keep the Boeing assembly line running at an optimal rate of two per month until the end of 2016.

The F/A-18E/F has recently lost bids for fighter deals in India and Brazil, but Gibbons says he remains optimistic that Boeing can attract enough new orders to keep reduction going until after 2020.

“There are a lot of countries flying legacy jets that are getting old – old from a capability standpoint and they need to upgrade to something like this,” Gibbons says, adding, “or old from a fatigue life and they need to be replaced.”

The hybrid concept comes on top of a broad range of upgrades that Boeing has previously proposed with the Advanced Super Hornet.

The upgrades include adding features such as conformal fuel tanks to extend the range, a podded weapons bay to reduce the aircraft’s radar signature and additional sensors and weapons.
http://www.flightglobal.com

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mar 26 Aoû 2014 - 18:21

J-5009 Swiss Air Force McDonnell Douglas F/A-18C Hornet
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mar 13 Jan 2015 - 12:34

Citation :
Latest Raytheon AESA Radar Soars in Flight Test

New capabilities designed to lengthen F/A-18C-D Hornet's relevance

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Jan. 12, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- A successful flight test of the Raytheon-built APG-79(V)X AESA radar system has demonstrated the functions needed to extend the relevance of F/A-18C/D Hornet fighter/attack jets, including:

extended detection ranges
simultaneous air-to-air and air-to-ground capabilities
production of high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mapping
industry leading reliability

"We put our latest AESA radar capability to the test and it exceeded our expectations," said Mike "Ponch" Garcia, business development director of Tactical Airborne Systems for Raytheon's Space and Airborne Systems business, and a former F/A-18E/F Super Hornet pilot/instructor. "Our APG-79(V)X combines the best features of our AESA portfolio to ensure low risk and give F/A-18C/D a tactical advantage for the next 15 to 20 years."

The company has delivered more than 500 tactical AESA tactical radars from its portfolio that includes the APG-79, APG-63(V)3 and APG-82(V)1 for F-15, F/A-18E/F, EA-18G and B-2 aircraft. The APG-79 system, a U.S. Navy program of record, flies globally on F/A-18E/F Super Hornets and EA-18G Growlers, and has seen service in four combat theaters since its first delivery in 2006.

"Raytheon fielded the world's first operational AESA radar for fighter aircraft in 2000," said Roy Azevedo, vice president for Raytheon's Space and Airborne Systems business. "Our portfolio of tactical AESA radars has now flown more than 500,000 operational hours – an industry first. We will continue to advance this technology to give our warfighters the greatest possible tactical advantage."
http://raytheon.mediaroom.com

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Mer 11 Mar 2015 - 10:30

Citation :
Boeing says optimistic about extending fighter line

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Boeing Co said on Tuesday it was optimistic about extending production of its F/A-18E/F and EA-18G fighter jets beyond 2017 given possible foreign orders and U.S. Navy officials' recent statements about the need for more planes.

Dan Gillian, who runs both fighter programs for Boeing, told Reuters the company expected Denmark to announce the outcome of its fighter competition in June or July, and that a Middle East order could come as early as the second quarter.

Boeing has been pursuing a possible order from Kuwait for years for an uncertain number of jets to be built in 2018.

Gillian said Boeing needed to decide by midyear, even before Congress passes a budget for fiscal 2016, whether to continue to support the production of the aircraft, or prepare for its closure after current orders run out at the end of 2017.

But he said the current difficult U.S. budget environment and the threat of resumed congressional budget caps in fiscal 2016 meant Boeing was unlikely to be as bullish in supporting the fighter line as it was during the last years of the C-17 production line in Long Beach, California.

"I'm optimistic about extending production and building more airplanes, but you have to make a balanced decision about where to put all your eggs," Gillian said in an interview.

"It’s a very tough budget environment ... and I don't think that you'll see Boeing do what we've done perhaps in the past," Gillian said. "Business risk is business risk."

Northrop Grumman Corp is a key supplier to Boeing on the F/A-18 and EA-18G jets, which are expected to remain in service through 2040, flying together with the new F-35 fighter jets built by Lockheed Martin Corp.

Boeing is also working on a range of upgrades for the jets.

Gillian said Boeing would decide in coming weeks whether to mount another major lobbying campaign for the production line.

U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert said on Tuesday he expected to complete work this week on a list of "unfunded priorities" for Congress that may include some F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter jets.

He said the Navy faced a possible shortfall of two to three squadrons of strike fighters, or up to 36 airplanes, on aircraft carriers in the 2020s, given problems with servicing older F/A-18 aircraft, also called legacy Hornets.

But it remains unclear whether Congress will fund any additional Boeing aircraft given competing demands for resources and uncertainty about whether lawmakers will agree to lift congressional budget caps that are due to go back into effect in fiscal 2016.

Boeing signed a memorandum of understanding with the Navy in December about slowing production to two planes a month from three, beginning in the first quarter of 2016, which would help extend production through the end of 2017, Gillian said.

He said Boeing planned to avoid layoffs through attrition and shifting workers to other programs.

Gillian said the company hoped to sign a contract with the Navy in the second quarter for 15 EA-18G electronic attack planes funded by Congress in the fiscal 2015 budget.
http://www.globalpost.com

_________________
Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jf16
General de Division
General de Division
avatar

messages : 21493
Inscrit le : 20/10/2010
Localisation : france Aiacciu
Nationalité : France
Médailles de mérite :


MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   Lun 10 Avr 2017 - 18:03

Citation :
Une nouvelle version du F/A-18 Super Hornet pourrait détecter les avions furtifs


Posté dans Forces aériennes, Industrie par Laurent Lagneau Le 10-04-2017




Ces derniers temps, après le coup de sang du président américain, Donald Trump, sur les coûts prohibitifs de l’avion de combat furtif F-35C Lightning II, développé par Lockheed-Martin, il a beaucoup été question du F/A-18 XT (ou Advanced Super Hornet) comme solution alternative.

Mais Boeing a une autre proposition dans ses cartons, basée sur une évolution du F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet actuellement en service au sein de l’aéronavale américaine.

Ainsi, selon Dan Gillian, le chef du programme F-18 chez Boeing, qui s’exprimait, la semaine passée, lors d’une conférence de la « Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space », l’idée de cette mise à jour est de faire de cet appareil, grâce à la fusion des données, un « noeud intelligent » du réseau « Naval Integrated Fire Control–Counter Air » [NIFC-CA, système de contrôle de tir permettant l’engagement à distance et transhorizon des menaces aériennes, ndlr] de l’US Navy.

Alors que, pour l’Advanced Super Hornet, Boeing mettait l’accent sur la furtivité, ce n’est plus le cas avec cette nouvelle version, appelée Block III. Et pour cause : cette dernière donnera la capacité aux F/A-18 Super Hornet de détecter les avions furtifs, ce qui présente un intérêt certain pour le Pentagone, avec les projets chinois (J-20, J-31) et russes (T-50, bombardier PAK DA).

En effet, il est question de doter le F/A-18 Super Hornet Block III d’un capteur lui permettant de suivre, à longue distance, la signature thermique des avions censés être furtifs, c’est à dire capables d’échapper aux radars. Mais Dan Gillian ne s’est pas attardé sur la nature de ce nouveau senseur.

En 2012, l’amiral Jonathan Greenert, alors chef des opérations navales de l’US Navy, avait relativisé l’importance de la furtivité des avions de combat. « L’augmentation rapide de la puissance de calcul des ordinateurs ouvre la voie à de nouveaux capteurs et à des méthodes de détection qui feront que la furtivité et ses avantages seront de plus en plus difficiles à maintenir au-dessus et en dessous de l’eau », avait-il en effet estimé dans un article de la revue de l’US Naval Institute.

Par ailleurs, cette version Block III prévoit également de donner au F/A-18 Super Hornet une autonomie plus grande. L’avionique serait évidemment modernisée, avec des écrans plus larges. Enfin, le maintien en condition opérationnelle (MCO) serait revu afin de d’augmenter le potentiel des appareils.

http://www.opex360.com/2017/04/10/nouvelle-version-du-fa-18-super-hornet-pourrait-detecter-les-avions-furtifs/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: F/A 18 Hornet around the world   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
F/A 18 Hornet around the world
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 4 sur 4Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4
 Sujets similaires
-
» Un beau livre: Hungry planet : what the world eats
» Sortie cinéma: "It's a Free World !"
» Petits personnages MINI WORLD
» World Names Profiler
» Panoramas and 3D Virual Tours of the Most Beautiful Places Around the World:

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Royal Moroccan Armed Forces :: Armement et matériel militaire :: Aviation militaire-
Sauter vers: