Royal Moroccan Armed Forces


 
AccueilS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Exercice African Lion 2010

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Moroccan Tankers
sergent chef
sergent chef
avatar

messages : 293
Inscrit le : 27/04/2009
Localisation : casablanca
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :

MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Ven 28 Mai 2010 - 19:20

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Nano
Colonel
Colonel
avatar

messages : 1539
Inscrit le : 18/05/2009
Localisation : Brest - Rabat
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :

MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Ven 28 Mai 2010 - 19:51

Donc la fameuse Utah National Guard y participe aussi...Ils sont sur tout les fronts
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
RED BISHOP
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 6127
Inscrit le : 05/04/2008
Localisation : france
Nationalité : Maroc-France
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Ven 28 Mai 2010 - 20:32

utah national guard est jumelé au FAR dans le cadre de l'opération jumelage National Guard-Africa
depuis elle a participer à tous les African Lion

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Spadassin
Lt-colonel
Lt-colonel
avatar

messages : 1388
Inscrit le : 30/03/2010
Localisation : oum dreyga
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :

MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Sam 29 Mai 2010 - 12:29

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
gigg00
Colonel-Major
Colonel-Major
avatar

messages : 2112
Inscrit le : 18/06/2008
Localisation : Kenitra-Venise
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :


MessageSujet: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 2 Juin 2010 - 12:27

Citation :
Hercs Move Marines to Southern Morocco, Prepare for Second Phase of African Lion


KENITRA, Morocco - Reserve Marine aircrews flying KC-130 Hercules aircraft moved about 300 Marines and sailors of Task Force African Lion from the coastal Moroccan city of Agadir to a training area several hundred miles south May 28.

The U.S. troops debarked the aircraft May 28 in a desolate airfield near Tan Tan and headed out to the Cap Draa training area, where they will conduct a variety of training missions with their Moroccan army counterparts.

The movement was part of African Lion 2010, month-long theater security cooperation exercise conducted annually between the U.S. military and Morocco to further develop joint and combined capabilities.

More than a thousand U.S. troops are participating in the exercise.

About 700 of the reserve Marines and sailors in this year's African Lion are from Marine Forces Reserve units throughout the United States.

"This is great for our young Marines to experience true military movement," said 1st Sgt. Brad Lauer of Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, a Marine Forces Reserve unit based in Chicago, Ill. "This exercise is all about training, and that includes how Marines get from point A to point B. This is just another great ride."

Although the trip was less than 200 miles by air, the drive on a convoy is typically more than six hours, as the two-lane road which navigates the route winds through treacherous mountain passes and numerous towns and villages along the way.

"It's definitely a comfortable ride," said Cpl. Antonio R. Ingarra, a radio operator with Headquarters and Service Company, 2/24. "On one of these [KC-130 aircraft], you can kick back and relax, whereas on a convoy, you have to stay alert. It's faster, and it's more efficient."

The two Hercules aircraft that ferried the Task Force Marines from Agadir to Tan Tan are from Marine Aerial Refueling Squadron 234, a reserve unit based in Fort Worth, Texas, with Marine Aircraft Group 41, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing.

The Hercs are here for about two weeks with the primary mission of conducting aerial refueling missions with the Royal Moroccan Air Force.

"At 13 hours it was a long day, especially for the loadmasters," said KC-130 pilot Maj. Ken Martin, who flew from his base here at Kenitra to make four lifts to ferry troops from Agadir to Tan Tan.

"When the winds are gusty, as it was, landings are bit more challenging. You're lining up on final, and with no notice the wind velocity jumps up 10 knots," said Martin. "You need to make continuous adjustments. It was a long day, but it was a routine day for us. It's satisfying to develop a plan, execute the plan and see it work."

A commercial airline pilot in his civilian career, Martin travels from his home town of Rapid City, S.D., to Fort Worth every month to keep up on his military flight hours. This is the second year in a row that he has participated in African Lion.

"There are more moving parts in this year's exercise," explained Martin. "We still have our primary mission of doing aerial refueling of the Moroccan F5 jets, but this year we're doing troop movements, as well."

In addition to transporting a group of U.S. Navy Seabee construction workers back to their home base in Rota, Spain, VMGR-234 has more than a dozen aerial refueling missions scheduled in the coming days. Then they'll fly their aircraft across the Atlantic and back to Texas in mid-June.

"As a reservist, this is our biggest event of the year," said Martin. "This is where we get our best training


Spoiler:
 

_________________

"  "تِلكَ الدَّارُ الآخِرَةُ نَجْعَلُها لِلَّذينَ لا يُريدُونَ عُلُوًّا فِي الأَرْضِ ولا فَسَادًا"
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
MAATAWI
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

messages : 14775
Inscrit le : 07/09/2009
Localisation : Maroc
Nationalité : Maroc
Médailles de mérite :



MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Jeu 3 Juin 2010 - 12:24

Citation :

Marines experience Morocco’s rich culture during African Lion 2010



6/1/2010 By Maj. Paul Greenberg, Marine Forces Reserve

KENITRA, Morocco —


Marines deployed here for exercise African Lion stepped outside their comfort zone May 29 to travel several hundred kilometers by bus to visit the historic Moroccan city of Fes and indulge in the local culture.
A detachment of Marines and sailors from Marine Aerial Refueling Squadron (VMGR) 234, a Marine Forces Reserve unit based in Fort Worth, Texas, is here on a two-week reserve summer deployment in support of this theater security cooperation exercise.
Over the course of about 17 days in country, the Marines are conducting both day and night operations in their KC-130 aircraft with the Royal Moroccan Air Force, performing their primary mission of refueling the Moroccan F-5 jet fighters while in mid-air.
In addition, the squadron is a key logistical arm of the Task Force, moving hundreds of troops around and out of the country.
However, all work and no culture can make a deployment a drab experience to quickly forget.
“This is good for the Marines to learn something about Moroccan history and culture,” said Sgt. Khalid Tament, a Moroccan Gendarme who accompanied the Marines on the tour.
Tament, who is fluent in English, French and Arabic, formed friendships with the Marines in the squadron while working on the Royal Air Base here. He assisted the tour guide and gave the Marines advice on bargaining for the best price for artisan goods in the shops.
“Today, they don’t have to worry about missions,” said Tament. “Today they can relax and be tourists and experience the real Morocco.”
The Marines and sailors spent most of their day in the Fes el Bali Medina, which is one of the oldest in the country. It was constructed in its current configuration in the 9th Century, and remains both a world-renowned tourist attraction and a routine place of commerce for locals.
“When you hear the word ‘Balak!’ that means get out of the way,” instructed Mohammed, the troops’ tour guide. “When you hear that, it means that a donkey cart will be coming through.”
Although the narrow walkways of the medina are off-limits to all vehicle and bicycle traffic, donkeys laden with produce and other goods clopped along the pavement behind their masters.
The Marines heeded the instruction of their guide, and backed against the walls or jumped into doorways to stay out of the way of the animals.
While in the Medina, the Marines had the chance to visit a traditional leather tannery which dates back to the 13th Century. The guide explained the leather tanning process in detail, and handed each of them a sprig of mint. He instructed them to shove the mint into their nostrils to ward off the strong stench of the tanning dyes, which are made primarily from pigeon excrement, limestone and salt.
Next to the tanning vats was a multi-tiered store with a maze of narrow doorways and stairwells. The walls of each room were lined with leather goods. One floor had jackets; another pants; an entire room was filled with handbags and backpacks of indeterminate age and endless variety of design. One Marine described the store as “a scene out of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.”
Despite the aroma, which ranged from mild to noxious depending on the room’s proximity to the tanning vats, the Marines bargained with the vendors and bought leather jackets, backpacks and various other items.
“It was really interesting,” said Staff Sgt. Seth Cavarretta, a squadron maintenance controller and airframes mechanic. “I really liked walking through the medina, seeing all the windy passages, artisans at work in the shops, the garments, and the spices.”
After several hours of touring the Medina, the troops were overdue for lunch. Their guide took them to a traditional Moroccan restaurant in the medina. They had their choice of couscous, tajine or pastilla.
“Too often, Marines go to foreign countries and only focus on the mission. They get stuck in their workspaces and don’t get out to really experience the culture. This is an important part of their deployment. They only get four days off out of the 25 days that we’re on this mission, and I wanted to make sure they got to see this,” said Maj. Mike Quirk, the VMGR-234 detachment commander.
“This is especially good for the maintenance Marines, who don’t get to deploy a lot,” said Quirk. “They spend most of their time back on the flight line in Fort Worth. So it’s really important that they get out and can experience this type of thing.”
After lunch, the group departed Fes, driving on a country road through lush rolling hills and fields of hay, vegetables, grazing livestock, vineyards and pungent olive groves.
“This looks just like central California,” commented Sgt. David Goldblatt, one of the squadron’s KC-130 loadmasters, who hails from the Golden State.
They passed through the city of Meknes and back into the country again, arriving at the final stop on their tour.
The Marines got out of their mini-buses and entered the site of the ancient Roman city of Volubilis.
These crumbling pillars, walls and columns represent the remains of a bustling city built by the Romans more than 2,100 years ago.
The troops hiked and climbed around the site with the European tourists there, taking photos and reading inscriptions.
“It was pretty amazing that this was the Romans’ western outpost at one time,” said Sgt. Alan McBride, an Active Reserve Marine from Yuma, Ariz., who works in the squadron’s flight operations department. This is McBride’s first overseas deployment in his six years in the Marine Corps.
“I didn’t realize that the Roman Empire stretched this far south,” commented McBride. “This has really been a great trip.”
The troops headed back to Kenitra as the sun set over the horizon.
Shortly after their return, U.S. Navy Capt. John Howard, the squadron’s reserve flight surgeon, explained the importance of this trip for unit cohesion and morale.“It was terrific, a great opportunity to get away from work for a day to see more of the Moroccan people we’re working with. On the airfield and up in the air, you see a limited view of the country,” said Howard, who has a private family medical practice at home in Clarendon, Texas. “To see the people that the military represent in Morocco is great. You work hard and you relax on deployment. It’s important to have a good balance.”



http://www.marines.mil/unit/marforaf/Pages/MarinesexperienceMorocco%E2%80%99srichcultureduringAfricanLion2010.aspx


FES, Morocco-A Moroccan tour guide provides Marines and sailors from VMGR-234 with a historical background of the Moroccan king's palace here, which was originally constructed in the 14th Century. This was the first stop on the troops' day-long tour of the region May 29. VMGR-234 is a reserve KC-130 squadron based in Fort Worth, Texas. They are here for about two weeks to support African Lion 2010, a joint and combined theater security cooperation exercise between the United States and Morocco. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 6:20 AM

  • FES, Morocco-Sgt. Austin Torres {LEFT} and Sgt. Sgt. Alan McBride from VMGR-234 watch a ceramic potter at work in an artisan village during a tour here May 29. The squadron is in Morocco for about two weeks to conduct aerial refueling operations with the Royal Moroccan Air Force and provide logistical support for African Lion 2010, an annual training exercise led by U.S. Marine Corps Forces Africa. VMGR-234, Marine Aircraft Group 41, is a 4th Marine Aircraft Wing squadron headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 7:09 AM















    FES, Morocco -Marines from VMGR-234 take a sightseeing tour of the ancient city of Volubilis here during a day-long trip through Fes and the surrounding region May 29. The crumbling pillars, walls and columns of Volubilis represent the remains of a bustling city built by the Romans more than 2,100 years ago. VMGR-234, Marine Aircraft Group 41, is a 4th Marine Aircraft Wing unit headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. The squadron is here for about two weeks to participate in exercise African Lion 2010. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg) , Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 2:26 PM
    FES, Morocco-A Moroccan tour guide provides Marines and sailors from VMGR-234 with a historical background of the Moroccan king's palace here, which was originally constructed in the 14th Century. This was the first stop on the troops' day-long tour of the region May 29. VMGR-234 is a reserve KC-130 squadron based in Fort Worth, Texas. They are here for about two weeks to support African Lion 2010, a joint and combined theater security cooperation exercise between the United States and Morocco. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 6:20 AM
    FES, Morocco-Sgt. Austin Torres {LEFT} and Sgt. Sgt. Alan McBride from VMGR-234 watch a ceramic potter at work in an artisan village during a tour here May 29. The squadron is in Morocco for about two weeks to conduct aerial refueling operations with the Royal Moroccan Air Force and provide logistical support for African Lion 2010, an annual training exercise led by U.S. Marine Corps Forces Africa. VMGR-234, Marine Aircraft Group 41, is a 4th Marine Aircraft Wing squadron headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 7:09 AM
    FES, Morocco-Staff Sgt. Kevin Powell, a KC-130 power lines mechanic with VMGR-234, shops for ceramic pottery during a tour of an artisan village here May 29. The Marines and sailors of the squadron took a one-day break from flight operations to explore Morocco's rich culture. They are here for about two weeks to support African Lion 2010, a joint and combined theater security cooperation exercise between the United States and Morocco. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 7:15 AM
    FES, Morocco-Maj. Wolfgang Von Aspe, a KC-130 pilot with the VMGR-234 detachment here, admires a ceramic mosaic during a visit to an artisan village with his Marines. To promote unit cohesion and give the troops an opportunity to experience Moroccan art and culture during their two-week stay, the troops took a tour of Fes and the surrounding region May 29. The squadron is here to support African Lion 2010, a joint and combined training exercise between U.S. Armed Forces and the Moroccan military. More than 700 Marines and sailors from Marine Forces Reserve are participating in this year's exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 7:23 AM
    FES, Morocco-Sgt. Lee Davis {RIGHT} and Staff Sgt. Brett Trahan of VMGR-234 use mint sprigs to ward off the pungent smell of the tanning dyes during a tour of a functional tannery here, originally built in the 13th Century. On their first day of rest and relaxation during their two-week deployment to Morocco, the troops of VMGR-234 took a tour of Fes and the surrounding region May 29. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 8:20 AM
    FES, Morocco-Marines sample Moroccan tea after lunch at a traditional restaurant in the Fes el Bali Medina here May 29. The Marines and sailors of VMGR-234 took a tour of the city and surrounding countryside during a one-day break from operations. The squadron is here to participate in African Lion 2010, a joint and combined training exercise between U.S. Armed Forces and the Moroccan military. More than 700 Marines and sailors from Marine Forces Reserve are participating in this year's exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 10:54 AM
    FES, Morocco -Marines from VMGR-234 take a sightseeing tour of the ancient Roman city of Volubilis here during a day-long trip through Fes and the surrounding region May 29. The squadron is based out of Kenitra Royal Air Base here for about two weeks to participate in African Lion 2010, a joint and combined training exercise between U.S. Armed Forces and the Moroccan military. More than 700 Marines and sailors from Marine Forces Reserve are participating in this year's exercise. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Maj. Paul Greenberg), Maj. Paul Greenberg, 5/29/2010 2:13 PM

  • _________________
    Le Prophéte (saw) a dit: Les Hommes Les meilleurs sont ceux qui sont les plus utiles aux autres
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    gigg00
    Colonel-Major
    Colonel-Major
    avatar

    messages : 2112
    Inscrit le : 18/06/2008
    Localisation : Kenitra-Venise
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :


    MessageSujet: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 8 Juin 2010 - 15:55

    Citation :
    Tankers Train Tenaciously in Moroccan Desert During AFRICAN LION 2010 Combined Exercise


    TAN TAN, Morocco — In close tandem with three others, the tank rocks back on its haunches as a massive ball of flame leaps from the barrel. A split second later, the tank lurches forward, settling, as a "BOOM!" reaches the ears of bystanders, the press of the concussion is felt, and a slow cloud of dust appears in the wake of the shell. Grins cover the sunburned faces of Marines from Fox Company, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division.

    "This job has its moments," smiles Lance Cpl. Justin Nolan, a tank crewman with 2nd Platoon, Fox Company, 4th Tank BN, 4th MarDiv. "Usually we only see one tank in action, so to see them together is pretty cool."

    For the past week, Nolan, a reserve Marine and full-time college student, has been living in the field with 32 other deployed Marines from his company. Their mission is simple, according to Maj. John Knapp, commanding officer for Fox Company, 4th Tank BN, 4th MarDiv.

    "We're providing a tank platoon for the AFRICAN LION final exercise with U.S. and Moroccan troops," he said. "We're also conducting annual training based on mission essential task lists to include live fire, platoon gunnery and maneuver training."

    The training tests a platoon's ability to work as a cohesive unit as they engage targets, according to 2nd Lt. Peter Heiman, platoon commander for 2nd Platoon, Fox Company, 4th Tank BN, 4th MarDiv.

    "We're accomplishing everything we're scheduled to, and then some," said Heiman. "Working with the Moroccans gives these Marines the opportunity to experience another way of doing things, and the challenge of working with another country. They're demonstrating their maneuvers and methods, and we're doing the same. We're excited to be out here."

    The challenge of working in new terrain also provides good training, according to Nolan.

    "This is definitely nothing like North Carolina," said Nolan. "You have to be careful when you're driving out here, otherwise you can pop track. Aside from that, I'd say adjusting to the climate has been the biggest challenge."

    Reserve units, which are required to remain combat ready, also face the unique challenge of accomplishing set training and education goals in very short amounts of time. The unit meets that challenge by pushing off-duty education and maintaining consistent contact with other Marines in similar occupational specialties.

    "At home, I read up," said Sgt. Travis Odell, tank commander with 2nd Platoon, Fox Company, 4th Tank BN, 4th MarDiv. "I do a lot of studying, and MCIs [Marine Corps Institute] help a lot. The junior Marines here have been great when it comes to learning new information. While we're out here, we're teaching them how to bore site a tank, call for fire, and how to deal with possible problems when conducting operations. They're totally motivated, which is not hard to be when you get to shoot guns."

    Nolan agrees.

    "This job is interesting," he said. "It's pretty technical, so there's always something to learn. You can never have too much knowledge about this tank, and I've been trying to absorb as much information as I can."

    Fox Company, which stood up in 2006, is a relatively young command, so mastering the essential tasks of shooting, moving and communicating in order to be combat ready is constantly emphasized.

    "My goal is to make sure these Marines optimize their time while they're out here," said 1st Sgt. Frank Gerraughty, company first sergeant with Fox Company, 4th Tank BN, 4th Mar Div. "We have so much training to do in such a short amount of time, so we have to use our time effectively."

    However, the company's driving pace of training in the dust and sleeping or standing watch under the open sky has been peppered with interactions with Moroccan troops. In addition to training with their Moroccan counterparts, the Marines have spent off-duty time with them, sharing meals and stories, and exchanging uniform items.

    "It's good to see we have friends out there," said Gerraughty, a 26-year veteran of the Marine Corps. "The Moroccans have been excellent to us – very hospitable. For our young Marines who maybe have never been out of the country, this exchange might well be a once in a lifetime opportunity. Being out here refines your perspective on life and interaction, and it's great to have the chance to be an ambassador of the U.S."

    AFRICAN LION 2010 is the largest exercise within U.S. Africa Command's area of activity, and is coordinated by U.S. Marine Forces Africa. It is an annually scheduled, joint, combined U.S.-Moroccan exercise. AFRICAN LION '10 brings together nearly 1,000 U.S. service members from 16 locations throughout Europe and North America with more than 1,000 members of the Moroccan military. The exercise is scheduled to end on or around June 9. All U.S. forces will return to their home bases in the United States and Europe at the conclusion of the exercise.


    Spoiler:
     


    Spoiler:
     

    _________________

    "  "تِلكَ الدَّارُ الآخِرَةُ نَجْعَلُها لِلَّذينَ لا يُريدُونَ عُلُوًّا فِي الأَرْضِ ولا فَسَادًا"
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    RED BISHOP
    Modérateur
    Modérateur
    avatar

    messages : 6127
    Inscrit le : 05/04/2008
    Localisation : france
    Nationalité : Maroc-France
    Médailles de mérite :



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Lun 14 Juin 2010 - 14:33

    African Lion 10 Cap Draa




    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    docleo
    Modérateur
    Modérateur
    avatar

    messages : 1765
    Inscrit le : 03/09/2008
    Localisation : de garde
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Lun 14 Juin 2010 - 15:10

    haha ca fait longtemps que je les ai pas vu ces deux la.
    j espere qu ils passeront residanat apres 4 ans de service.
    sinon il est magnefique l app d echographie portable
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    http://medecinsmaroc.xooit.com/index.php
    Viper1912
    Caporal chef
    Caporal chef
    avatar

    messages : 171
    Inscrit le : 18/01/2009
    Localisation : lille
    Nationalité : Maroc

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Lun 14 Juin 2010 - 18:48

    C'est de l'equipement marocain ou américain ?
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    docleo
    Modérateur
    Modérateur
    avatar

    messages : 1765
    Inscrit le : 03/09/2008
    Localisation : de garde
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Lun 14 Juin 2010 - 19:02

    le "patient" et l'opérateur sont us, donc c'est us, sinon pas tous les médecins sont inities a l echographie sauf s'ils passent un DIU en echo (je parle la des médecins généralistes pas spécialiste) mais les marocains aussi disposent d app echo portable au niveau des antennes medico-chir.
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    http://medecinsmaroc.xooit.com/index.php
    Yakuza
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 21623
    Inscrit le : 15/09/2009
    Localisation : 511
    Nationalité : Maroco-Allemand
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 17:39

    belle fin
    au menu:kornet tirés,tanks et gazelles armées,la prochaine version aura encore une plus grande envergure,avec une composante amphibie et autres..

    Citation :
    U.S. and Moroccan troops wrap up exercise African Lion 2010

    6/15/2010 By Maj. Paul Greenberg , Marine Forces Reserve

    CAP DRAA TRAINING AREA, Morocco — U.S. service members taking part in African Lion 2010 wrapped up their training here June 9 in a final combined arms exercise with the Royal Moroccan Army.

    “African Lion in Morocco is very important for both the Marine Corps and the United States government. This is a strategic relationship with one of the United States’ oldest allies,” said Marine Corps Reserve Maj. Gordon Hilbun, assistant operations officer for Task Force African Lion. “This relationship maintains a strong collaborative training opportunity for both militaries and ensures that the Marine Corps maintains its expeditionary capabilities and mindset.

    More than 1,000 Marines, sailors and U.S. Air and Army national guardsmen participated in African Lion this year, with the preponderance of troops coming from Marine Forces Reserve units throughout the United States.
    This is the seventh year in a row that U.S. troops have come here for this exercise, which Marine Corps Forces Africa, headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany, has the lead on facilitating.

    The final exercise was a culmination of more than four months of planning, mass logistical movements and detailed coordination between U.S. and Moroccan diplomatic and military leadership.
    In the exercise scenario, several enemy mechanized units had intentionally crossed into Moroccan territory. A joint U.S. and Moroccan task force was formed to repulse the enemy with a combination of air and ground capabilities. These included helicopters, tanks, armored vehicles, artillery, mortars, combat engineers and mobile assault platoons.

    After Moroccan Kornet guided missiles initiated the attack, combat engineers from 4th Combat Engineer Battalion in Roanoake, Va., used their Bangalore torpedoes to blast a hole through the breach.

    “It was excellent,” said Cpl. John Saunders, a reserve Marine with 4th CEB who helped to emplace the 33 pounds of high explosives and secured the fuse igniter systems. “Our goal from the time we dismounted, emplaced the charge and withdrew was 90 seconds, and we beat it. When that bunker buster went off, it was incredible.”

    The Moroccan Army provided the air power with Gazelle helicopters strafing their targets with missiles.

    U.S. and Moroccan tanks closed in, hammering old tank hulks with high-explosive rounds and machine gun fire.
    The American M1A1 Abrams tanks came from Company F, 4th Tank Battalion headquartered at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

    “It was a good show, and great practice maneuvering and firing as a platoon,” said platoon commander 2nd Lt. Peter Heiman, who is on his first deployment as an officer in the Marine Corps Reserve. “The Moroccan tankers seem to really know their stuff.”

    Heiman explained that earlier in the week, he and his Marines had the chance to meet with the Moroccan tankers, climb inside their tanks and shoot their weapons.

    “It was really great training,” said Heiman, “One of their sergeants had been on the same tank for 26 years. One thing I can say is that they’re really experienced.”

    Cpl. Matthew Ross, a 23-year-old vehicle commander with 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion in Quantico, Va., also had the chance to work with Moroccan troops prior to and during the final exercise.

    “My initial impression is that they are very professional,” said Ross, a five-year reserve Marine who is a senior at Georgetown University. “They know what they need to be doing at all times. There is no laissez faire leadership. They’re like us; mission oriented. They always knew what was going on.”

    A linguistics major with a focus on Arabic and Dari languages, the exercise gave a Ross both a chance to exert his leadership as a first-time vehicle command and to practice Arabic with the Moroccan soldiers.

    “There are a lot of things you can take away from the exercise,” said Ross. “It proves to the Marines that you can work with a foreign military force in a (military to military) exercise and see that they can have an equal level of professionalism. We can integrate with foreign militaries if the mission dictates. The Marines at the (noncommissioned officer) level have confidence that they can work successfully with a foreign military that speaks another language, and with a culture that is really different. There is a very specific commonality between them and our Marines: military professionalism.”

    While the tanks were blasting away at their targets, Marine Corps mortarmen from Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment fired their 81 millimeter mortar rounds.

    “This was a very positive experience overall,” said Sgt. Timothy Gena a reserve Marine mortars section leader with Weapons Company, who also had the chance to train with his Moroccan counterparts prior to the final exercise.

    “They have the French and Spanish versions of the weapons (81 millimeter mortars), but it’s the same concept. What was amazing is that we were able to work with them without an interpreter, and these guys, (the Moroccans) were really good. This kind of thing is very important, especially for the junior Marines, who may not have done this before, or who might have had a negative experience in the past. It’s great to come here for (annual reserve training) and come away with a respect for the Moroccans. I think we had a mutual respect here.”

    While the troops on the ground put the pincers on the notional enemy forces, the U.S. and Moroccan senior leadership sat together watching the fiery show from a vantage point on a hill nearby.

    After the successful completion of the live-fire, Moroccan Gen. Abdul Al Aziz Benani, General of the Royal Moroccan Army Corps, spoke to the American delegation, which included Samuel L. Kaplan, the U.S. ambassador to Morocco, and Marine Corps Reserve Maj. Gen. James M. Croley, the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing commanding general.

    “This is a beautiful thing, when you shoot and hit your target,” said Benani. “I want to tell you how satisfied we are, and I want to thank you for your work to make this exercise successful.”

    Although this year’s African Lion has come to a close, U.S. and Moroccan planners are already looking at next year’s exercise, which is expected to bring even more Marine Forces Reserve units here and involve a broader range of U.S. and Moroccan troops.

    “The evolution of this exercise would entail an amphibious offload and a larger training force to include expanding our current combined training relationship with Moroccan forces,” said Hilbun. “Marine Forces Africa is becoming a focus of effort for the Marine Corps. This exercise provides us with continued access to one of our key strategic partners in Africa as the United States continues to maintain a national focus on expanding our involvement on the African continent.”
    Marines.mil

    Citation :
    CAP DRAA, Morocco-Marine Corps Reserve Maj. Benjamin Wagner (right) the commanding officer of Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, and Col. Abdelmajid Chazi of the Royal Moroccan Army coordinate with vehicle maneuver elements of both countries' forces during the culminating live-fire exercise of African Lion 2010, a theater security cooperation exercise conducted annually between U.S. and Moroccan forces., Maj. Paul Greenberg , 6/9/2010 6:15 AM


    Citation :
    Smoke rises from a training range during maneuvers that took place during the AFRICAN LION 2010 final exercise here, June 9.


    Citation :
    Colonel Anthony Fernandez III, combined joint task force commander for AFRICAN LION 2010, observes live fire and maneuvers taking place on a training range during the final exercise here, June 9


    Cool
    Citation :
    Moroccan helicopters advance during a combined U.S.-Moroccan live-fire and maneuver final exercise here for AFRICAN LION 2010, June 9.


    Citation :
    Reserve Marines from 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, headquartered in Quantico, Va., speed through the southwestern Moroccan desert in their light armored vehicle here June 8. The mobile leathernecks served as a key component of the maneuver element during the final exercise here June 9 for African Lion 2010, a theater security cooperation exercise conducted annually between U.S. and Moroccan forces.


    Citation :
    An M1A1 Abrams tank from 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division in Camp Lejeune, N.C. races into position to help kick off the final exercise of African Lion 2010 here June 9. Along with more than 700 other Marines and sailors from Marine Forces Reserve units throughout the States, 4th Tanks came here to participate in this theater security cooperation exercise conducted annually between the U.S. military and the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces.

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Invité
    Invité



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 20:57

    Très belles images!!
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    PGM
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 9836
    Inscrit le : 12/12/2008
    Localisation : paris
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :


    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 21:36

    Belles series, merci yak.
    S'ils pouvaient laisser les M1 sur place...je suis sûre que vous y avez pensé.

    PGM
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Invité
    Invité



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 21:55

    PGM a écrit:
    ...
    S'ils pouvaient laisser les M1 sur place...je suis sûre que vous y avez pensé.
    ...

    Oui, j'y ai pensé wellah! avant même de lire ton post.


    Très belles images J'aime bien celle là Arrow

    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    RED BISHOP
    Modérateur
    Modérateur
    avatar

    messages : 6127
    Inscrit le : 05/04/2008
    Localisation : france
    Nationalité : Maroc-France
    Médailles de mérite :



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 22:50

    African Lion monte en puissance d'année en année
    et l'armée royale est de plus en plus impliquer dans les exercices
    l'utilisation des Kornet et de Gazelle le prouve...

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Yakuza
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 21623
    Inscrit le : 15/09/2009
    Localisation : 511
    Nationalité : Maroco-Allemand
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mar 15 Juin 2010 - 23:57

    le plus interessant c´est le scenario,et l´intervention marocco-americaine,que je laisse le soin a chacun de l´interpreter..
    Citation :
    In the exercise scenario, several enemy mechanized units had intentionally crossed into Moroccan territory. A joint U.S. and Moroccan task force was formed to repulse the enemy with a combination of air and ground capabilities. These included helicopters, tanks, armored vehicles, artillery, mortars, combat engineers and mobile assault platoons.
    ca vous rappelle quoi la 2eme photo?

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Invité
    Invité



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:04

    Moi ça me rappelle la guerre du golf! Des puits de pétrole qui brûlent

    je file
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Yakuza
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 21623
    Inscrit le : 15/09/2009
    Localisation : 511
    Nationalité : Maroco-Allemand
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:08

    non regarde bien

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    FAMAS
    Modérateur
    Modérateur
    avatar

    messages : 6524
    Inscrit le : 12/09/2009
    Localisation : Zone sud
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:26

    le scénario suppose que c'est les blindés ennemis qui ont pénetré en "territoire marocain" on ne vas pas assister l'US à irakiser qui que ce soit, mais on montre ce qui attend toute colonne de T90 qui risque de venir parader chez nous, le message est claire
    on peut dire sans rougir que nous avons l'armée la plus oppérationnelle qui soit en Maghreb

    _________________
    "La stratégie est comme l'eau qui fuit les hauteurs et qui remplit les creux" SunTzu  


    Dernière édition par FAMAS le Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:28, édité 1 fois
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    http://lepeeetlebouclier.blogspot.com/
    Fremo
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 21551
    Inscrit le : 14/02/2009
    Localisation : 7Seas
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :



    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:26

    Il y a un mur de sable ... ( la ceinture ?! )
    sa me rappele les exercices du T'sahal prés du Golan

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Yakuza
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 21623
    Inscrit le : 15/09/2009
    Localisation : 511
    Nationalité : Maroco-Allemand
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 0:28

    le mur avec des blindés cramés dessus Wink

    _________________
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Northrop
    General de Division
    General de Division
    avatar

    messages : 4566
    Inscrit le : 29/05/2007
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 1:01

    Merci Yak elles sont magnifique les photos

    Bah ca va ca devient du lourd "African Lion" (bientot ca sera le "Bright Star" de chez nous ..)

    O sinon la 2eme photo me fait penser au conflit avec les polz (leur tentatives d'incursion vers la fin du conflit) en gros cette photo me fait pensé a une attaque polz

    _________________

    الله الوطن الملك
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    reese
    Colonel
    Colonel
    avatar

    messages : 1640
    Inscrit le : 10/05/2009
    Localisation : alger
    Nationalité : Algerie
    Médailles de mérite :

    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 10:57

    FAMAS a écrit:
    le scénario suppose que c'est les blindés ennemis qui ont pénetré en "territoire marocain" on ne vas pas assister l'US à irakiser qui que ce soit, mais on montre ce qui attend toute colonne de T90 qui risque de venir parader chez nous, le message est claire
    on peut dire sans rougir que nous avons l'armée la plus oppérationnelle qui soit en Maghreb

    d apres toi les USA prendraient part aux combats au coté des FAR en cas d hypothétique invasion Algerienne ?
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    PGM
    Administrateur
    Administrateur
    avatar

    messages : 9836
    Inscrit le : 12/12/2008
    Localisation : paris
    Nationalité : Maroc
    Médailles de mérite :


    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   Mer 16 Juin 2010 - 11:17

    Co-training, simplement. il n'y aura jamais d'intervention US auprès des marocains contre qui que se soit.
    Et le scénario de colonne de T90 qui pénètrent au maroc par la zone la plus découverte (donc dangereuse) est plus qu'improbable. Personnes n'est assez fou pour envoyer ses chars au casse-pipe sans soutien aerien. L'ennemi n'est quand meme pas aussi bête que ça... et que feront les gazelles si elles mêmes se font chasser...
    Comme évoqué dans les scénarios de conflit, une pénétration par le sud, est un non sens (des centaines de km dans le desert, à découvert avec des lignes de communications et d'approvisionnement très étirées, et sans cible d'importance : occuper le desert et faire un blitzgrieg sur les dunes de sables, c'est moyen comme stratégie). Dans l'hypothèse d'une défense contre l'algerie, à mon avis, la principale ligne de defense se situera sur les 400/500 km de la frontière nord.
    PGM
    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
    Contenu sponsorisé




    MessageSujet: Re: Exercice African Lion 2010   

    Revenir en haut Aller en bas
     
    Exercice African Lion 2010
    Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
    Page 2 sur 4Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant
     Sujets similaires
    -
    » Semi Marathon 2010 de la Légion Etrangère à Castelnaudary
    » Grande Tétée 2010 - Lyon
    » 4ème Festival des Arts Mélanésiens - 2010
    » "Normandie impressionniste 2010".
    » Foire de Lessay 2010.

    Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
    Royal Moroccan Armed Forces :: Forces Armées Royales :: Contrats d'achats et autres-
    Sauter vers: