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 OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels

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MessageSujet: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mar 15 Mar 2011 - 2:29

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Citation :
Shipborne versatility: offshore patrol vessels

The world’s naval forces task offshore patrol vessels with diverse missions, depending on the range of challenges they face. Tim Fish reports Offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) cannot be placed into a single category defined by a specific role or mission; they can range in size from coastal patrol boats or large fast attack craft (about 500 tons) up to corvette or
frigate-sized ships (2,500 tons).
Navies and coastguards use OPVs to suit specific needs that depend on the size of the service and the location of the country, as well as the political climate of the region in which the vessels operate. Drivers for the procurement of OPVs include cost, as small countries with limited naval budgets generally cannot afford larger warships; the need to demonstrate a maritime presence, protect resources and enforce a state’s maritime laws; and requirements for managing increasingly large coastal sovereign zones.
In 1967, a state’s jurisdiction over the sea was increased from 3 n miles to sovereign territory extending to 12 n miles – an area in which the coastal state is responsible for all activities under and on the water. This was extended in 1994, when regulations governing a 200 n mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ) came into force with the approval of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Part V of UNCLOS grants the state sovereign rights over the seabed, its subsoil and the water adjacent to the seabed within the 200 n mile limit.
Negotiations are taking place that could see the influence of coastal states extended beyond the 200 n miles of EEZs. Part VI of UNCLOS concerns a coastal state’s continental shelf out to 350 n miles from the coastline.
In 2007, Ireland became the first country to gain approval for the extension of its continental shelf, to the west of the island, and now has responsibility for an area of some 141,000 sq n miles – an increase of 100 per cent. The Irish Naval Service has found itself with insufficient ships with which to police this
zone. Dublin has put out requirements for two80-90 m-long OPVs and a single 130-140 m-long extended patrol vessel (EPV). The new patrol vessels must have a range of 6,000-8,500 n miles and not only undertake patrolling duties but also
fishery protection, search and rescue (SAR), maritime protection, drug interdiction, anti-pollution and vessel boardings. The EPV must also have space for an embarked force of troops and vehicles.With the gradual expansion of sovereign oceanic territory over the past 40 years, naval forces have been procuring ships that not only provide general law enforcement and SAR capabilities, but also pollution control, firefighting and towing services. Larger warships are not suited to the management of EEZs, so to fill the gap between the smaller coast-hugging patrol craft and the larger ocean-capable warship, OPVs are becoming important assets that are increasing in demand across the globe.
Role-play David Bricknell, director of systems and naval product strategy at Rolls-Royce, told that he believes there are two main types of OPV: combat OPVs and niche capability OPVs. Combat OPVs are designed to provide a small but well-equipped warfighting vessel as a substitute for a larger ship such as a frigate or corvette. These OPVs can reach higher speeds and are often fitted with anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-air warfare (AAW) and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) weapon systems, and are designed for rapid response and to take part in battles if required. Designed to naval standards, this type of ship meets all of the necessary survivability standards associated with a warship.
Countries that procure OPVs designed for combat operations are largely located in or near the Middle East or Southeast Asia, according to Bricknell. Sea conditions are generally relatively calm in these regions, where maritime security takes priority over other naval missions near ‘pinch points’ and areas of tension.
In other parts of the world, OPV designs reflect requirements for sovereignty enforcement of national interests particularly associated with the EEZ area cover fishing and mineral rights, law enforcement patrols and an Arctic or Antarctic ice capability; hydrographic, research and survey work; and disaster response.
Bricknell said that niche OPVs are larger and designed for endurance rather than speed, have the ability to operate in high Sea State conditions and, although armaments can be added to these ships, they provide a naval capability for “presence” missions and “are not equipped to fight battles”. Built to commercial standards and equipped with fewer armaments, niche OPVs are cheaper than their combat counterparts and can be operated with fewer crew members. Designed with a heavy helicopter capability, they can undertake most EEZ activities, but these are secondary to the specific role for which they are
designed.
One of the main changes in OPV design relates to the “increasing interest” in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, where “endurance and presence” is important, Bricknell said. Standard OPV designs “do not have this strength” and he expects that some future niche capability presence OPVs will be expected to operate in “mixed ice conditions in and amongst broken ice”.
Melting of the polar ice caps has allowed greater access to the Arctic region and raised hopes of securing oil, gas, diamond and uranium resources, and fish stocks. It could also lead to the opening of the Northwest Passage, which could result in significant changes in world maritime trading patterns. Interest in the region follows territorial disputes relating to Part VI of UNCLOS between the Arctic states (Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia and the United States), which have each submitted claims to the UN to extend their continental shelf. Canada’s naval assets are not able to operate effectively in the Arctic, so
requirements were announced on 9 July 2007 for a new class of up to eight Polar Class 5 Arctic/OPVs (A/OPVs) in a CAD3.1 billion (USD2.7 billion) programme. Requirements for the A/OPVs include an endurance of up to four months near the Arctic ice pack in conditions up to Sea State 7. The ships will be armed and capable of embarking the new CH-148 Cyclone maritime helicopter. With a top speed of 20 kt, the A/OPVs will have steel reinforced hulls designed to plough through year-old ice fields up to 1 m thick, as well as pockets of older, thicker ice. Bricknell believes the A/OPV project will be “fairly commercial” in nature to keep costs down, rather than including too many expensive naval capabilities.
The Norwegian Coast Guard’s KV Svalbard, an Arctic-class ship, is one example as is the Rolls-Royce designed Danish Arctic patrol ship, the Knud Rasmussen class. Rolls-Royce designed the Norwegian vessel KV Harstad, a 3,200 ton Ulstein UT 512-class salvage and rescue tug, bought in July 2008, with similar requirements in mind and two similar ships, UT 512Ls, which are currently under construction for Iceland. According to Rolls-Royce, the83 m-long Harstad is equipped for patrolling, pollution control, and outfitted with oil-spill control equipment and fast boarding/rescue boats.
At the opposite end of the scale to presence OPVs are combat vessels such as the United Arab Emirates’ (UAE’s) Baynunah-class vessels, which are being built by local shipbuilder Abu Dhabi Ship Building (ADSB). Located near the strategic
chokepoint of the Strait of Hormuz, the UAE has an acute understanding of naval security. Its requirements are for a multirole combatant for patrolling UAE territorial waters and the EEZ with an AAW and ASuW capability, for the protection of critical assets and commercial shipping in the Persian Gulf.Despite displacing just 630 tons, ADSB classes the OPVs as corvettes. The ships are equipped with a considerable number of weapon systems including the MBDA Exocet MM40 Block 3 surface-to-surface missile (SSM) and the Raytheon Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM) RIM-162 surface-to-air missile (SAM).The Baynunah class is also fitted with an Oto Melara 76 mm gun and two 27 mm cannon. With four MTU 12V 595 TE 90 diesel engines powering three Kamewa waterjets (two driving a single steering waterjet with the remaining two each
driving a booster waterjet), the vessels will be able to achieve a maximum speed of 32 kt. The ships also have an organic helicopter capability, mine-avoidance sonar system, MASS decoy system, 3-D radar and a full communications suite. Mike Stamford, director of sales at ADSB, told that many types of vessels can be categorised as OPVs, or even ocean-capable patrol vessels (OCPVs). Not only has the term started to encompass more types of ship, but whether to use the term or not depends on the political situation the navy in question faces. “Often the term OPV is used as a political expedient as OPVs are perceived to be more passive and defensive, whereas the terms corvette, frigate or destroyer are perceived to be overtly offensive and aggressive.“It is not surprising that some OPVs are multirole and heavily armed, lighter scantling and faster, whereas others are larger, heavier, therefore slower, and equipped for the purposes of survey [and] pollution control. I think in the past some of the vessels which now come under the banner of OPV would have previously been called something else, such as corvette, light frigate or fishery protection vessel, but due to the current fad they fall under the generic term of OPV.”
Gulf patrol UK-based BVT Surface Fleet is building both combat OPVs for the Royal Navy of Oman (RNO) and presence OPVs for the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard. Under Oman’s Project Khareef, BVT is building three new OPVs for the RNO – the first of which is due to launch in 2009. Oman has selected the Exocet anti-ship missile and Mica vertical-launch close-area air-defence systems, and at 98.5 m in length and displacing 2,500 tons, the Khareef-class corvettes are much larger than the UAE’s Baynunah OPVs, although their weapons capabilities are similar. The location of Oman and the size of the EEZ mean that their ships require an ocean-going capability. Larger size means the ships will have better seakeeping qualities and longer endurance of more than 4,500 n miles. The three presence OPVs being builtby BVT for the Trinidad and Tobago Coast
Guard will meet a requirement for protection of oil and gas reserves located near the coastlineof the Caribbean islands, as well asfor fishery protection and anti-drug operations.
Production of Ship 02 started in mid-2008, with handover expected in early 2010, and construction of Ship 03 is due to start in early 2009 for a handover scheduled for late 2010. At 90.5 m in length and displacing about 2,000 tons, the OPVs are designed to reach a maximum speed of 25 kt and achieve an endurance of 5,000 n miles at 12 kt. The OPVs can accommodate a crew of 70, but are capable of being operated by 34 personnel with dormitory space for a further 50 troops. Each vessel will carry a high-speed interceptor craft and be fitted with a 20 m-long flight deck for helicopter deployment. In addition, a 16 tonne capacity crane will be fitted to enable the load and offload of cargo in port.
Tim Yarker, export sales director at BVT, told that the Trinidad and Tobago OPVs represent a “significant increase” in the country’s operational capability, as the ships “can carry out regional security tasks and delivery of humanitarian assistance in a hurricane zone”. He added that this is also the case with the RNO, where procurement of the Project Khareef corvettes is a “scaling up” of the navy, as the ships will provide new capabilities.“There is no definition of an OPV … OPVs are all things to all men,” Yarker said. The existence of so many such vessels suggests that each customer appears to have a different set of procurement criteria. Endurance or presence OPVs usually have fewer survivability features, such as reduced shock standards or duplicity of systems. Yarker said that if this kind of ship gets into a “serious fight … its role is finished” – the ship is naturally not likely to be able to sustain damage inflicted by a stronger adversary. However, if the job of the OPV “is not to get in the way of the enemy”, survivability characteristics are not so important, Yarker explained.
Each country faces a unique set of circumstances that influences OPV procurement decisions, Yarker believes. He added that the OPV market has not increased in size as “the only people that have come into the OPV market that were not there before are the New Zealanders and the Dutch, who have accepted a capability reduction in their fleet”. In September 2003, the Netherlands decided to reduce the capability of its navy and set in motion the sale of four Karel Doorman M-class frigates, intending to replace them with smaller patrol vessels. Dutch shipbuilder Schelde Naval Shipbuilding was contracted in December 2007 to build four OPVs for the Royal Netherlands Navy under Project Patrouilleschepen that are due to enter
into service from 2011-13. The ships will be equipped with fewer combat systems than their predecessors and have been designed for patrol, surveillance and interdiction operations in the Netherlands EEZ, Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. According to Schelde, the new patrol ships will be 108 m long and displace some 3,750 tonnes, which would make them larger than the 3,320 ton frigates they replace.The ships will have a maximum speed of 21.5 kt and will support expeditionary
forces ashore with space for an NH90 helicopter, two 12 m rigid-hulled inflatable boats (RHIBs) and one fast rescue boat. Armaments include a single 76 mm gun, a 20-30 mm gun and two machine guns. The vessels will be built to commercial standards, but will feature added ballistic protection and a gas citadel. Crewed by 50 personnel, the patrol ships will have additional accommodation for 40 people and space for 100 evacuees. Lean machin Schelde owner Damen has divided the construction of the four ships equally between Schelde’s facilities at Vlissingen in the Netherlands and the Galati shipyard in Romania. The ships are halfway through the detailed engineering stage and steel-cutting began in both Galati and Vlissingen in August 2008, with the keel laying for the first ship anticipated in November.
Leon Goossens, manager of product development at Schelde, told that the development of OPVs will include more high-speed interceptors for boarding operations and drug-trafficking interdictions. Goossens believes the development of “the integrated single-mast configuration in top-side designs will continue not only for the larger OPVs and frigates, but also for the smaller coastal or littoral patrol vessels”. “Electrical propulsion will be adopted on patrol vessels for cruising speed as auxiliary propulsion and in the future also for main propulsion with multiple generating sets, possibly adopting a battery concept for power supply from different kinds of modular energy sources.”
A reduction in crew size can be achieved through increased levels of automation in both the platform and combat systems, and through the reduced onboard maintenance needed on modular equipment and systems. Goossens said that
modularity principles will be applied to a ship’s configuration to a higher degree to allow for increased commonality and the exchange of systems between ships – even between those of different sizes – as well as to facilitate the
upgrade process.
The Damen Group has been contracted to build three emergency response vessels for the Swedish Coast Guard. These patrol vessels are specifically designed as multipurpose vessels for normal coastguard duties along the major shipping lanes from St Petersburg, the Baltic Sea and into the North Sea, but also with capabilities for emergency response activities. The first two ships were contracted on 21 December 2005, with a third vessel with chemical recovery capabilities contracted in April 2007. The 81 m-long vessels have Ice Class 1AS capabilities, but are not intended as ice breakers. They are capable of carrying out rescue operations; firefighting; towing; oil containment, with 600 m of ocean boom; oil recovery (capacity of about 400 tons of crude oil per hour); lighterage of crude oil; remotely operated vehicle operations; and bottle diving support operations. The vessels are also equipped with two fast patrol boats and a heavy crane for recovery duties. Schelde said the first ship, KBV 001, is nearing completion and will commence trials in November 2008, with delivery expected in December or early January 2009. KBV 002 has been launched and delivery will take place five months after KBV 001. The third ship, KBV 003, is still under construction. KBV 001 is due to commission in the first quarter of 2009, with KBV 003 expected to commission by the end of the same year. German shipbuilder ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) has also turned its attention to the OPV sector. Jonathan Kamerman, managing director of TKMS International, told that most OPVs can do 90 per cent of the routine or non-combatant tasks of a frigate. Kamerman believes that in recent years the shift in the security paradigm at sea from high-symmetric threats (short duration, high intensity) to asymmetric threats (sustained, low intensity) has meant that ship requirements have gone “from complex platforms, complex C3 [command, control and communications], sensors and effectors, [and] high cost, to simple platforms, basic combat systems and low cost”.
Bridging platformMany naval forces have high-end frigate-sized ships and low-end small patrol ships, but nothing to fill the capability gap in between.
“That is where OPVs come in,” said Kamerman. As maritime mission requirements move away from civilian missions such as humanitarian, SAR, firefighting and environmental protection, towards naval missions such as counter-terrorism, crisis response, special operations and combat, “costs increase as task and platform complexity go up”, said Kamerman.
Managing the right force balance, so that a navy does not have to resort to using large warships for fisheries patrol or end up with ships too small to operate in an EEZ, is about achieving “mission sufficiency”, said Kamerman. Navies should choose a low-cost ship with a limited mission-defined combat suite that can carry out both civilian and some lower-order naval tasks, he added.
According to Kamerman, the “sufficient vessel” is a simple, robust platform playing the mothership role to fast interceptor boats and a helicopter. These assets would be deployed for surveillance, interdiction, boarding, inspections, arrest and seizure, special forces insertion and shallow-water access and mobility. The ship should be equipped with tactical networking and an onboard special forces or marine contingent. The reaction time and tactical mobility of the ship should be defined not by the ship itself but by its assets (i.e. the vessel systems).
To achieve a cost-effective platform, Kamerman warns that navies must avoid the traditional cost drivers. He said that OPVs should use commercial design and build standards, and retain a modest speed requirement of “between 19 to 23 kt”.
The use of TEU container payloads is another way of increasing capability cheaply. OPVs do not need stealth characteristics as this would “reduce operability”, Kamerman said.
It is the application of combat systems and sensors that represent the biggest potential cost increases. The combat system has to be mission-defined and limited to the low-intensity capabilities required to prevent cost and mission growth. However, good communications systems are paramount and should not be skimped on. Basic C2 (for an adequate surface tactical picture), navigation and 2-D search radar systems should be applied, “but nothing more than that”, said Kamerman. Equipment for real-time threat analysis or weapons assignment is not required on an OPV, which should instead rely on electro-optical (EO) sensors as the “primary sensors”.
For weapons fit, a 20-40 mm cannon and some 12.7 mm machine guns will suffice, but the addition of larger guns, missiles or sensors, such as a 3-D radar or sophisticated anti-air fire-control systems, would push the ship into the more expensive high-end combat realm. Sticking to these principles does not mean that a ship cannot have good growth potential. Space and weight can be provided for systems that have not actually been fitted, allowing for future flexibility – as in the case of the large Dutch OPVs.
Kamerman said the OPV must have good seakeeping up to at least Sea State 5 to allow for the operation of a helicopter and fast boats. OPVs should generally be short and fat, and while this means the vessels will be slow, they will provide stability and increased interior volume. For stability OPVs should have active fin stabilisers, bilge keels, a bulbous bow, wet deck inhibitors, and good freeboard for deck wetness reduction as well as lee creation for boat operations.
Launch pad OPVs that are longer and thinner can achieve faster speeds, but are less stable and cannot safely operate a helicopter in conditions above Sea State 3 or 4. Kamerman believes OPVs must be optimised to support the launch and recovery of helicopter and boat assets. A large helicopter deck with stores space, to support a 12 tonne transport helicopter with hover in-flight refuelling, and the ability for day and night operations, should be a key OPV requirement. For boat operations, the OPV should be equipped with two (or preferably four) large RHIBs (of more than 9 m in length) with large work spaces, capability for low-speed manoeuvrability, single self-compensating lifting point gantry davits and a boat loading crane.
TKMS has developed a series of four central designs of 1,000-2,000 ton OPVs reflecting these specifications: a 67 m fast OPV; an 81 m Guardian-class OPV displacing about 1,800 tons; an 85 m, 1,900 ton Sentinel-class multimission OPV; and a larger 99 m version of the Sentinel OPV displacing 2,100 tons, all with the same 13.9 m beam standardising the hull form. Built to commercial standards, the vessels are equipped with a helicopter and boat capability, modest speed, sensors and weapons equipment; they are short and fat, for good seakeeping, and with growth potential for future equipment installations.
Spanish shipbuilder Navantia is also adhering to these principles for the construction of the first four Buque de Acción Maritima patrol ships for the Spanish Navy at its yard in Ferrol. Up to eight ships will be built to a modular design for low-intensity operations: counter-terrorism patrolling; protection of maritime resources; maritime interdiction; and port security.
Displacing 2,500 tons, the ships are lightly armed with a single Oto Melara 76 mm gun and two 20 mm cannon, and fitted with the SCOMBA combat management system (CMS), but are capable of launching a helicopter (with a hangar for an NH90-sized aircraft) and are to be equipped with two RHIBs. They will be equipped with a crane, space will be provided for three standard containers and there will be plenty of additional space for operations, crew and working areas.
A spokeswoman for Navantia told : “The strict control of the naval budgets has forced the main world navies to get this type of vessel, as they are smaller ships orientated to maritime security and to patrol in economic exclusive waters in order to control national safety. But also demand has grown in order to control terrorism, drugs and immigration.”
Navantia estimates that about 200 units will be built over the next few years, ranging from 500-2,500 tonnes. The main trend identified in the OPV market is the “tendency in these ships for more automation and reduction of crew [to] about 40 people and this allows a considerable saving of budget”.
The company also started production of the first of four 2,419 ton POVZEE (Patrullero Oceánico para la Vigilancia de la Zona Económica Exclusiva) ocean patrol ships for the Venezuelan Navy at its Puerto Real yard near Cadiz on 11 September. Deliveries are scheduled for May 2010, September 2010, February 2011 and July 2011 respectively.
The 98.9 m-long ships will be used for EEZ protection duties, but have the propulsion and weapons for a much wider-ranging role including maritime security, surveillance, law enforcement, SAR, pollution control and humanitarian relief missions. Each vessel will have four 4,400 kW MTU 12V 1163 TB93 diesels and twin shafts with variable-pitch propellers, giving a maximum speed of 24 kt and endurance of 3,500 n miles at 18 kt. The POVZEE ships will be equipped with a 76 mm gun and a 35 mm gun, with Thales providing the Tacticos CMS, Sting optronic director, Mirador trainable EO observation system and SMART-S 3-D air/surface-search radar. POVZEE will have a flight deck and hangar for day/night helicopter operations and two semi-rigid launch boats.
Argentina is seeking to build five 80 m-long OPVs to a proven design at its Río Santiago yard under the Patrulleros de Alta Mar programme. The ships are intended to range from 1,500-1,800 tons and be equipped with a 40-76 mm gun, but the invitation of bids was delayed, causing the Argentine Navy to join forces with the Chilean Navy to procure five vessels based on the same machinery and systems.
Chilean naval programmes have proved to be more successful, with the commissioning of the first of two Proyecto Danubio IV OPVs, Piloto Pardo, in June 2008. Built by ASMAR at its Talcahuno yard to an 80 m Fassmer design, the ships are powered by twin Wärtsilä 12V 26 diesel engines for a speed of 20 kt and with the capability to embark a medium helicopter and two 7 m Pumar RHIBs. Armed with a single 40 mm naval gun mount, there is space for a 76 mm gun if required. The second ship, Policarpo Toro, was launched in October and is due to be delivered in mid-2009.
Brazil plans to acquire 11 OPVs from 2009-25, but funding problems have led to delays. In September 2006, an order for two NAPA 500-class 477 ton vessels based on CMN Group’s Vigilante 400 CL 54 design was approved. Built by local manufacturer INACE at Fortaleza, the two ships are due for delivery in 2009, with a class of eight ships planned (orders for a further four have been approved). However, Brazil still has a requirement for ocean-capable vessels displacing about 2,000 tons, like those being acquired by Argentina and Chile.
Future capability Goa Shipyard Limited in India has been contracted to build a series of 105 m-long, 2,215 ton OPVs for the Indian Navy. The ships are based on the Indian Coast Guard’s advanced OPV ICGS Sankalp, which was launched in April 2006. Construction of the first of the new OPVs began in 2007, with first deliveries expected in 2009-10. Three vessels had been laid down by May 2008 – with plans for a fourth ship – each worth between USD80 million and USD120 million. They will be armed with a 76 mm naval gun and two 30 mm cannon, and will be capable of operating a single Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) Dhruv helicopter.
In addition to three light frigates ordered from Schelde and a FREMM frigate from French shipbuilder DCNS, the Royal Moroccan Navy is set to update its patrol ship fleet with the procurement of four 70 m-long OPVs from Raidco Marine and Aker Yards (as subcontractor for hull construction). Equipped with a 76 mm gun and 40 mm cannon, the ships will carry out surveillance and fishery control operations in Morocco’s EEZ. The decision was confirmed by Raidco Director Jean-Michel Monnier in late May, with delivery of the vessels due to begin in 2010. The ship’s unit cost is expected to be about USD30-40 million.
The French Navy maintains a sizeable fleet of patrol and support vessels that regularly deploy to French Overseas Departments and Territories. In September 2008, senior officials reiterated the need for a new class of vessels to replace the nine D’Estienne d’Orves-class (Type A 69) 1,300 ton patrol frigates, 10 P400-class patrol ships and support ships over the next decade.
The new-generation patrol vessels will replace the P400 patrol ships, which will reach the end of their service lives from 2010 onwards. However, the programme schedule is not yet defined and the nature of the replacement vessels is uncertain, possibly involving units larger than the current 477 ton displacement P400.
The replacement support vessels, dubbed bâtiment d’intervention et de souveraineté (intervention and sovereignty vessels), will be capable of transporting and supporting a company-strength (120) troop detachment with up to 20 vehicles, weapons and equipment. Rolls-Royce intends to offer a variant of its UT offshore support vessel. The programme has not yet entered a preliminary phase or been included in budget planning. Both projects may be combined into a single programme for up to 20 units.
As a part of its Future Surface Combatant (FSC) programme to recapitalise the UK Royal Navy surface fleet, the UK Ministry of Defence will replace ageing patrol ships and minehunters with a single class of eight 2,000 ton multimission ocean-capable patrol ships (designated C3 – the third type of ship to be procured under FSC). The ships will undertake maritime security, special, mine countermeasures and interdiction operations. C3 funding is being separated from the rest of FSC and tied to the Future Mine Countermeasures capability, as the ships have different drivers to the C1 and C2 components.
For many small navies, procurement of OPVs is a step towards acquiring something bigger. Navies seeking to deploy powerful warships must first become established as a modern, effective force and learn to operate smaller ships.
In other cases, a country may already have an OPV construction capability, and instead seek to purchase designs and systems that meet requirements, while building the hull themselves.
Jane's

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Lun 1 Aoû 2011 - 17:38

Citation :
DCNS effectue la première sortie en mer du patrouilleur hauturier Gowind L’Adroit

Fer de lance de l’ambition de DCNS sur les marchés des navires militaires de petits et moyens tonnages, l’OPV* Gowind L’Adroit a débuté le mercredi 27 juillet ses premiers essais en mer. Durant cette opération, les équipes DCNS vérifient les qualités nautiques du navire.
Quatorze mois après le début de sa construction, l’OPV Gowind L’Adroit a entamé sa phase d’essais en mer. Ce très innovant patrouilleur hauturier destiné à des missions de sauvegarde maritime est donc entré dans une nouvelle phase de sa réalisation, en conformité avec le planning de production.
« Cette première sortie à la mer constitue un symbole, fruit d’un remarquable travail entre les équipes DCNS, les investisseurs et coréalisateurs du projet et l’équipage de conduite du navire », souligne Marc Maynard, directeur du programme OPV Gowind. « Grâce à l’implication et aux savoir-faire de chacun, les ambitieux jalons industriels du programme se franchissent les uns après les autres avec succès », rappelle-t-il.
Au cours de cette période en mer, l’équipe à bord, composé d’une cinquantaine de techniciens, enchaîne les tests de façon intense pour s’assurer des bonnes performances nautiques du navire. Après avoir procédé aux essais des systèmes de sécurité – lutte contre les sinistres tels les incendies ou voie d’eau – les équipes ont vérifié le bon fonctionnement de la propulsion et la bonne manœuvrabilité du navire. En complément de ce programme seront également essayés les systèmes de navigation (calculs de vitesse, position, cap), les centrales inertielles (pour le positionnement du navire) ainsi que d’autres systèmes de la plateforme propulsée. Le bon déroulement de ces essais est facilité par l’étroite collaboration entre les membres du bord et l’équipage de conduite. Ce dernier, civil, est composé de 14 collaborateurs de la société VNavy, à qui DCNS a confié la charge de piloter le navire.
De retour à quai, l’aménagement des derniers locaux et les travaux de peinture va se poursuivre. Les équipes DCNS achèveront la construction du navire à la fin de l’année 2011.
Au-delà de cette première sortie en mer, cet événement constitue une nouvelle démonstration de la capacité de DCNS à relever le défi de concevoir et réaliser un navire particulièrement innovant dans un délai inférieur à 24 mois en respectant scrupuleusement le budget alloué.
Construit sur fonds propres et demeurant propriété de DCNS, l’OPV Gowind L’Adroit sera mis à disposition de la Marine nationale pendant 3 ans. L’objectif est d’obtenir pour ce produit une qualification « sea proven » (éprouvé à la mer), ce qui conférera au Groupe un atout sans équivalent pour la promotion de Gowind à l’international.
La Marine nationale pourra démontrer en haute mer la pertinence et la valeur opérationnelle de ce patrouilleur hauturier Gowind pour des missions actuelles et émergentes : surveillance de zone, lutte contre la piraterie et le terrorisme, police des pêches, lutte contre les trafics de drogue, préservation de l’environnement, aide humanitaire, recherche et sauvetage en mer, sécurité maritime.
Mesurant 87 mètres, le patrouilleur hauturier Gowind L’Adroit a une autonomie de 8 000 milles nautiques. Il peut rester plus de 3 semaines en haute mer, atteindre une vitesse de 21 nœuds et accueillir un hélicoptère et des drones. Il ne requiert qu’un équipage réduit de 30 personnes et peut transporter en plus une trentaine de passagers.
Les bâtiments de la famille Gowind présentent d’importantes innovations au service des marines, des commandos et des gardes-côtes : la visibilité sur 360° depuis la passerelle, une mâture unique pour une couverture radar à 360°, la mise en œuvre discrète et en sécurité en moins de 5 minutes d’embarcations rapides, l’exploitation de drones aériens et de surface… Cette gamme de navires Gowind bénéficie également de l’expertise de DCNS dans les systèmes d’information et de commandement. Les bâtiments de la gamme Gowind permettent ainsi une surveillance étendue de l’espace maritime et la détection automatique de comportements suspects. Celle-ci est réalisée grâce à la mise en réseau des communications entre les navires présents sur la zone et les centres à terre.

http://fr.dcnsgroup.com/2011/07/28/dcns-effectue-la-premiere-sortie-en-mer-du-patrouilleur-hauturier-gowind-l%E2%80%99adroit/

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Dim 1 Avr 2012 - 13:36

Le concept OPV du chantier naval indien Goa présenté à DefExpo2012








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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mar 1 Mai 2012 - 23:56


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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Jeu 28 Juin 2012 - 9:54

Citation :
Fassmer Presents New Naval OPV at Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

assmer actively participated in the OPV Latin America conference held in Rio de Janeiro on the 21st and 22nd of May. During the Conference organized by IQPC and the Brazilian Navy, Fassmer presented its new Naval OPV, an 80m offshore patrol vessel design aiming at higher threat scenarios and matching the mission requirements of navies demanding small corvettes within restricted budgets.



Fassmer actively participated in the OPV Latin America conference held in Rio de Janeiro on the 21st and 22nd of May. During the Conference organized by IQPC and the Brazilian Navy, Fassmer presented its new Naval OPV, an 80m offshore patrol vessel design aiming at higher threat scenarios and matching the mission requirements of navies demanding small corvettes within restricted budgets.

The naval OPV is a platform based upon the same philosophy of the popular Fassmer OPV80, but able to deploy a variety of ASW, ASuW weapons as well as improved self-defense capabilities within a platform with reduced signatures, enhanced survivability and higher speed.

During the conference, great attention was also dispensed to the presentations of Admiral Giancarlo Stagno of the Chilean navy and Admiral Cesar Gomez of the Colombian navy, both discussing the successful history of their Fassmer OPV80 building programs as well as their outstanding operational experiences.

http://www.seanews.com.tr/article/worldship/79952/Fassmer-/

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Jeu 26 Juil 2012 - 15:55

Il y a pas de détails pour la photo de l'OPV de Damen malheureusement, je trouve que c'est un concept intéressant à étudier ..




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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mer 8 Aoû 2012 - 14:17

Citation :
Pipavav bags two international orders worth Rs 1,192 crore
Posted On: Aug 07, 2012
MUMBAI (PTI): Pipavav Defence and Offshore Engineering Company (formerly Pipavav Shipyard) Monday said it has bagged two international orders worth Rs 1,192 crore from a West African client for building two offshore patrol vessels.

This is the first international order for Pipavav, which has recently ventured into defence sector, the company said in a statement.

It added that the contract also has the option to increase the order to two more such vessels and has to be delivered in 32 months.

Pipavav, however, did not disclose the name of its client from whom it has secured the orders.

"The contract value is pegged at Rs 1,192 crore with two option ships which can be exercised by the client within 24 months upon which the contract value may go up to Rs 2,504 crore," it said.

The company further said it is negotiating for four numbers corvette type warships with a global major but did not disclose further.

"One of the thrust areas of the company is to focus on foreign military sales to the friendly countries," the company said.

The offshore patrol vessels are a 95 meter long and are similar to five vessels for which the Ministry of Defence has placed orders with Pipavav last year, it added.

The company further said after the order its current order book size has increased by 20 per cent, though did not reveal its total order book size.

Shares of Pipavav closed on Monday at Rs 61.25 apiece on the BSE, down 2.16 per cent from the previous close.
http://brahmand.com/news/Pipavav-bags-two-international-orders-worth-Rs-1192-crore/9879/1/24.html
A Quelle marine ouest africaine pensez-vous tout en sachant que le Nigeria a eu 2 opv chinois
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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mer 19 Sep 2012 - 2:17

très intéressant study ... Rolling Eyes

pourquoi je sens qu'on vise bien le marché marocain avec ce nouveau concept :

Spoiler:
 

Citation :
Les CMN dévoilent leur nouveau patrouilleur hauturier multifonctions






La Vigilante 1400 CL 79crédits : CMN
Les Constructions Mécaniques de Normandie présentent un nouveau design de patrouilleur hauturier multifonctions. Cette plateforme est conçue pour répondre aux contraintes budgétaires des marines en proposant un bâtiment aux coûts d’exploitation réduits mais aussi très polyvalent, à même de remplir non seulement les missions traditionnellement confiées aux patrouilleurs, mais également d’autres fonctions clés, comme la chasse aux mines, la lutte anti sous-marine et la lutte contre la pollution. Longue de 79.2 mètres pour une largeur de 13.6 mètres et un tirant d’eau de 3.6 mètres, la Vigilante 1400 CL 79, selon la propulsion adoptée, peut atteindre la vitesse de 25 nœuds et franchir 8000 milles à 12 nœuds. Conçue pour rester en opération durant 30 jours, elle est armée par un équipage réduit, comprenant seulement 25 marins, mais peut héberger 25 passagers supplémentaires, par exemple des forces spéciales. A cet effet, le nouveau patrouilleur des CMN, dont la coque est en acier et les superstructures en aluminium est pourvue d’une passerelle avec vision à 360°, compte deux niches sur chaque bord pour des embarcations commando (RIB) de 9.5 mètres.





La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 (Image : CMN)



Un système de bossoirs ultraperformant



Et c’est le système de bossoir du Norvégien Vestdavit qui a été retenu pour assurer la mise à l’eau des semi-rigides. Considéré comme ultra-performant et retenu notamment par la marine allemande sur les frégates du type 124, ce système, qui s’inspire des équipements utilisés dans l’offshore, est doté d’un dispositif d’absorption de chocs et d’un compensateur de roulis et de tangage (système amorti avec trois axes de rotation), avec gestion de la vitesse de descente en fonction de l’état de la mer. Grâce à l’amortisseur de houle et à un croc à largage automatique, l’ensemble permet de sécuriser au mieux les personnels et le matériel durant les opérations de lancement et de récupération des embarcations, qui peuvent, selon Vestdavit et le retour d’expérience de la marine allemande, être mise à l’eau bien au-delà d’un état de mer 5. Le système serait, de plus, extrêmement réactif, puisqu’il faudrait moins d’une minute pour lancer un RIB, les opérations pouvant être contrôlées visuellement depuis la passerelle. Ces dispositifs de mise à l’eau sont, en fait, le système d’armes principal de la Vigilante 1400 CL 79 puisqu’en dehors des semi-rigides, ils peuvent aussi déployer d’autres équipements, comme on le verra plus loin. On notera aussi qu’une troisième embarcation de 9.5 mètres peut être logée sur la plage arrière, sa mise à l’eau étant assurée au moyen d’une grue.





La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 avec l'une de ses niches pour RIB (Image : CMN)





Le système de mise à l'eau de Vestdavit (Image : DR)



Beaucoup d’espaces modulaires



En termes de moyens aéronautiques, le patrouilleur compte une plateforme de 270 m², pouvant accueillir un hélicoptère de 10 tonnes de type NH90, et un hangar pour une machine de 5 tonnes, comme le Panther, ou des drones aériens, les CMN travaillant notamment, sur ce sujet, avec l’Autrichien Shiebel, dont le Camcopter S-100 constitue le premier drone aérien de la Marine nationale (testé à titre expérimental, cet engin, qui a été accidentellement perdu cet été, devrait être prochainement remplacé). S’étalant sur une surface de 180 m², la plage arrière dispose, quant à elle, d’une grue d’une capacité de 8 tonnes à 4 mètres et, en dehors de l’aire de stockage pour un RIB, compte un espace pour loger des conteneurs de fret, ou bien servir au stockage de matériels spécifiques. Des conteneurs aménagés peuvent également être utilisés, par exemple pour un état-major. Ils s’ajoutent alors aux locaux opérationnels logés sous la plateforme hélicoptère. Cet espace modulaire dispose d’un accès direct à la plage arrière.





La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 (Image : CMN)



CO séparé et mât unique



Retravaillée en termes de sécurité, d’ergonomie et de tenue à la mer par rapport aux anciens designs proposés par les CMN, la nouvelle Vigilante compte un Central Opération (CO) séparé de la passerelle, de manière à permettre aux opérateurs de travailler à l’écart de l’agitation qui règne souvent dans la timonerie. En termes de moyens électroniques, le bâtiment est équipé du C-Mast, le mât unique développé par les CMN, Inéo et Cassidian, qui abrite un radar de veille (de type TRS-3D,ou Sea Giraffe), des systèmes optroniques, des équipements de guerre électronique et de communication. L’armement de base comprend un canon télé-opéré de 20mm, par exemple le Narwhal de Nexter, ainsi que des affûts de 12.7mm. Mais, en cas de besoin, le patrouilleur est également conçu pour mettre en œuvre de l’artillerie plus lourde, allant jusqu’au canon de 76mm, asservi à une conduite de tir.





La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 peut être dotée d'un canon de 76mm (Image : CMN)



Configuration guerre des mines



La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 a été conçue pour remplir des missions très variées, comportant la surveillance et le contrôle d’espaces océaniques et d’approches maritimes, la lutte contre la piraterie et les trafics illicites, la police des pêches, le recueil d’informations et la mise en œuvre de commandos. Mais, et c’est une grande nouveauté, la Vigilante peut, également, être configurée en bâtiment de guerre des mines et de lutte anti sous-marine. A cet effet, les CMN ont travaillé avec l’Allemand Atlas Elektronik, l’un des leaders mondiaux du domaine. Le patrouilleur a, ainsi, été adapté pour pouvoir mettre en œuvre des drones et engins télé-opérés de type SeaOtter Mk2 et SeaFox, conçus pour la détection, l'identification et la neutralisation de mines. Ces moyens seraient déployés depuis les systèmes de mise à l’eau des embarcations. La modularité de la plage arrière et des locaux, notamment ceux situés sous la plateforme hélicoptère, permettra en outre d‘accueillir toute l’infrastructure et les équipements nécessaires à une opération de chasse aux mines mais aussi de lutte anti-sous-marine.





Drone anti-mine SeaOtter Mk2 (Photo : ATLAS ELEKTRONIK)



Le concept de l'OPV anti-sous-marin

A ce titre, les CMN ont également travaillé avec Atlas afin d'intégrer sur le bâtiment le système ACTAS (Active Towed Array Sonar), un sonar remorqué actif à basse fréquence, qui peut être déployé depuis la plage arrière. L'ouverture d'un domaine ASM sur un bâtiment de type OPV (Offshore Patrol Vessel) est en effet sérieusement étudiée dans certains états-majors. Des marines d'Europe du nord réfléchissent notamment à ce concept d’emploi, dans un contexte de restriction budgétaire, qui incite à limiter le recours aux grandes frégates anti-sous-marines, très couteuses et trop spécialisées pour certaines missions. Un OPV doté de moyens ASM pourrait, ainsi, être employé dans la lutte contre les narcotrafiquants, qui ont développé l'utilisation de moyens submersibles, par exemple dans les Caraïbes. Il pourrait également remplir des missions de renseignement et de repérage et, dans certains cas, travailler en coopération avec un bâtiment doté de moyens lourds pour l'interception et la neutralisation de menaces sous-marines. Une capacité offensive peut néanmoins être intégrée sur le patrouilleur via la mise en oeuvre d'un hélicoptère équipé de moyens ASM, comme des torpilles légères.



Lutte contre la pollution



Un autre grand atout du patrouilleur, en termes de polyvalence, est sa capacité à intervenir contre une pollution maritime. A cet effet, le patrouilleur peut accueillir soit une version de lutte antipollution « classique » comprenant un barrage flottant déployé depuis la plage arrière, un écrémeur mis à l’eau et des réservoirs flottants tractés ; soit une version conteneurisée développée par la société LAMOR, plus compacte, comprenant deux récupérateurs latéraux et des réservoirs tractés. Ces différentes solutions seront présentées lors du prochain salon EURONAVAL Les CMN travaillent par ailleurs avec la société Ecocéane afin de proposer une variante de la Vigilante dotée de bras récupérateurs pouvant être déployés à l’arrière. La particularité du concept sera que le bateau effectuera sa manœuvre de récupération des pollutions flottantes en marche arrière, de manière à optimiser le recueil des déchets tout en protégeant mieux la coque. Comme pour la guerre des mines, les locaux modulaires pourront servir à l’accueil des équipes et du matériel spécifique.

Fortes de ce nouveau concept, les CMN, déjà en discussion à l’export avec ce navire, comptent le proposer à la Marine nationale dans le cadre du programme BATSIMAR, qui doit se traduire par la commande de 18 bâtiments de surveillance et d’intervention maritime destinés à remplacer l’ensemble des patrouilleurs et frégates de surveillance français.





La Vigilante 1400 CL 79 (Image : CMN)

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MessageSujet: ....   Jeu 15 Nov 2012 - 16:05

Citation :
At IndoDefence 2012, German shipyard TKMS presented its latest range of Corvettes and OPV



TKMS presented its latest range of OPV and patrol Corvettes during IndoDefence, Indonesia's No.1 tri-service defence event, held in November 2012 in Jakarta. TKMS was showcasing its FLEXpatrol stealth patrol vessel, its MEKO 100 Patrol Corvette and its Guardian class OPV. These three classes of vessels are particularly matching the needs and requirement of South East Asia region navies.









Model of a MEKO 100 Patrol Corvette on TKMS stand during Indo Defence/Indo Marine 2012








On display at TKMS stand during the event was a model of the MEKO 100 Patrol Corvette. This class is based on the K130 Corvette (currently in use with the German Navy) and on a class already selected by a country in the region: The MEKO 100 Patrol Vessel has indeed been selected by the Malaysian Navy.

The Patrol Corvette version of the MEKO 100 combines the cost efficiency of a regular OPV with the enhanced warfighting capabilities of a Corvette type of vessel. A typical weapon fit would consist in:
» 1x 76mm main gun
» 1x 40mm secondary gun
» 2x 20mm cannon
» 4x Anti-ship missiles
» 8x SAM VLS cells

Sensors would typically consist in 3D Surveillance radar, hull mounted and towed array sonars, jammer and decoy systems... Such a weapon and sensor fit makes the MEKO 100 Patrol Corvette a true multi-purpose ship capable of conducting the full spectrum of modern naval missions (ASUW, ASW, AAW, Special Operations support, Anti-Piracy, etc.)









TKMS MEKO OPV as shown during Indo Defence/Indo Marine 2012








Also showcased at IndoDefence 2012 (presented on a flat screen) was the MEKO OPV. Just like the MEKO 100 Patrol Corvette, the OPV version of MEKO is also based on the original MEKO 100 Patrol Vessel design.

With a mix of commercial and military standards the vessel is a very flexible and economic solution for customer requirements ranging from the upper sphere of the military mission spectrum through to coast guard and even civilian missions.

The MEKO OPV shown at IndoDefence had the following specifications:
» Lenght of 87.30m
» Beam of 13.90m
» Full load displacement of 1,820 tons
» Crew of 78 sailors
» Propulsion: 2x MTU 12V 1163 TB93 (4,400 Kw each)

The MEKO OPV is equipped with a large helicopter deck and may carry modules to provide adequate utility spaces for temporary berthing of Special Forces, disaster victims or refugees, or the temporary storage of emergency supplies.









TKMS/Kockums FLExpatrol multi-mission Patrol Vessel
(Image: TKMS)








Finally TKMS was showcasing the futuristic FLEXpatrol multi-mission patrol vessel. Even tough no models or interactive screens were on display to showcase this particular class (we were told logistic choices had to be made), several TKMS experts on this class were present at IndoDefence to present the vessel to official delegations. They agreed to give some information about this avant-garde ship to Navy Recognition.

Based on the Swedish Navy Visby class (and not MEKO) the FLEXpatrol revolves around the GHOST system (Genuine, Holistic, Stealth) which aims at reducing all emissions from the ship (radar, acoustic, infra-red, and electromagnetic). Just like with the Visby class, one of the main requirements with FLEXpatrol is stealth. However, while Visby class ships are very customized and dedicated ship per request from the Swedish Navy, the FLEXpatrol other focus is versatility: It clearly is a multi-role vessel capable of carrying modular mission modules in order to conduct very different and very dedicated missions.

The FLEXpatrol is a fast moving, extremely versatile vessel requiring split-second decision making procedures. Accrued operational experience on the Visby corvettes has led us to believe in the shortest possible chains of communication between CIC, nautical and engine personal, a fact leading up to the one-station SuperBridge design. Each work station is interactive, a feature contributing to high grades of redundancy and the speeding up of processes.

The FLEXpatrol’s landing deck and hangar accommodate aircraft of up to five tons, as for example the Eurocopter, SeaLynx, Bo-108 etc. Obviously the same aircraft facilities are the ideal platform for deploying Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV).

The FLEXpatrol’s drive chain comprises of four 3.4 MW diesel engines coupled to two steerable waterjets with reverse buckets. The drive chain confi guration guarantees excellent speeds, economic operations and (paired with the azithruster forward), maximum manoeuvrability. All diesel exhaust outlets are located beneath the waterline and cooled in order to reduce IR signatures.

Weaponry and decoys are hidden behind flush fitted flaps in the FLEXpatrol’s angled hull. This feature, in combination with special coatings, minimize the bouncing-back of radar signals to emitters, and therefore render the FLEXpatrol exceptional levels of invisibility to most sensors. The outstanding stealth properties give eventual weapon deployment all the benefi ts of the surprise factor.
navyrecognition.com

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Sam 9 Fév 2013 - 23:36

Fremo a écrit:
Le concept OPV du chantier naval indien Goa présenté à DefExpo2012








INS Saryu

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mar 12 Fév 2013 - 16:21

Citation :

CMN to unveil a new patrol craft design at NAVDEX 2013: The OCEAN EAGLE 40

In 2013 CMN confirms its will to propose innovating designs to meet the requirements expressed by the most exacting navies. In addition to the COMBATTANTE SWAO 53 and COMBATTANTE FS 56 new projects already presented in 2012, CMN goes on and introduces in 2013 new designs as performance criteria of its vessels.

Based on its experience gained with the building of almost 350 vessels, 90 of which belonging to the COMBATTANTE type, which have been delivered worldwide thus making the reputation of CMN and are considered by all as performing, reliable and durable vessels accessible to all navies, CMN today presents a new design of Fast Patrol Craft:


OCEAN EAGLE 40 Maritime Surveillance Trimaran
(Picture: CMN)

The OCEAN EAGLE 40 shall be shortly presented during the next IDEX / NAVDEX exhibitions in Abu Dhabi.

The OCEAN EAGLE 40 is a compact multirole vessel capable of high performances, which can be operated in missions aiming at the protection of coastal zones or strategic offshore infrastructures as well as for electronic warfare or for Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance missions using air drones (UAV).

The OCEAN EAGLE 40 is designed to meet the requirements expressed by modern Navies and Coast-Guards whose concern is to acquire a fast patrol craft with a consistent capability of intelligence and surveillance allying high speed and extended endurance.













First Previous 1 / 1 Next Last


(Pictures: CMN)

CMN has developed a multirole patrol craft, capable of optimized performances and easy to operate, designed to be able to fight against piracy and terrorism, to control illegal traffics and to support special operations or search and rescue missions.

In addition to a 30-knot high speed enabling rapid intervention into the zone to be treated, the multihull design of the OCEAN EAGLE 40 offers an excellent arrangement associating performance and endurance. 5000 Nautical Miles can be covered by the OCEAN EAGLE 40 with a crew reduced to seven officers/ratings with an additional capability to accommodate 8 persons as members of Special Forces, for example.

The extended platform of the OCEAN EAGLE 40 is designed to receive a 300kg-class aerial drone. The OCEAN EAGLE 40 is equipped with a self-defense capability including a 20 or 30mm teleoperated gun and two 12.7mm machine guns with a 360° fire range.

In terms of electronic warfare the OCEAN EAGLE 40 offers large detection and surveillance means including a C-ESM function, an electro-optical one as well as a navigation and surveillance radar capacity. In addition a sitcom data link connection enables to send pictures, videos and tactical data, the whole equipment being interfaced with the “Combat Management System” and the “Integrated Navigation System”.

The OCEAN EAGLE 40 is without any contest the multirole fast patrol craft fully satisfying the requirements of the Navies and Coast-Guards wishing to acquire a reliable new design of vessel offering excellent intervention and aerial surveillance capabilities.

Discover the CMN OCEAN EAGLE 40 during NAVDEX 2013 on CMN stand C-003
www.navyrecognition.com/index.

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Mer 13 Mar 2013 - 22:07





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MessageSujet: ...   Ven 6 Sep 2013 - 18:15

juba2 a écrit:
alors pourquoi on la categorise comme OPV?
parceque c'est une definition des missions à venir  et normalement armement light ( pas de capacité ASW ETC )

tout comme les FLOREALS par expl
bien sur que le BIR ANZARAN est un OPV tout comme les OPV 64 de la classe RAIS BARGACH


La marine royale les classe dans la division PHM ( patrouilleurs haute mer)
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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Ven 6 Sep 2013 - 18:21

atlas a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:
alors pourquoi on la categorise comme OPV?
parceque c'est une definition des missions à venir  et normalement armement light ( pas de capacité ASW ETC )

tout comme les FLOREALS par expl
C'est une corvette à 3amo Atlas,
Elle est dotée d'armement lourd 4 MM40B3 12 Mica VL et un 76SR. Elle manque d'armement ASW, bien qu'elle est plus lourde que les Sigma.

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MessageSujet: Re: OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels    Ven 6 Sep 2013 - 19:31

Fremo a écrit:
atlas a écrit:
juba2 a écrit:
alors pourquoi on la categorise comme OPV?
parceque c'est une definition des missions à venir  et normalement armement light ( pas de capacité ASW ETC )

tout comme les FLOREALS par expl
C'est une corvette à 3amo Atlas,
Elle est dotée d'armement lourd 4 MM40B3 12 Mica VL et un 76SR. Elle manque d'armement ASW, bien qu'elle est plus lourde q

ue les Sigma.
Oui et alors.

Ils l.ont doté d'armements pour augmenter ses capacité es
Mais c.est un Opv
On peut faire pareil avec les OPV 70
Tout depend les menaces potentielles

On peut le ranger dans les corvettes...mais c.est pareil
Question de doctrine.........
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OPV: Offshore Patrol Vessels

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