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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Ven 15 Mar 2013 - 9:55

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NAVAL BASE KITSAP-BREMERTON, Wash. (March 13, 2013) Sailors' vehicles are directed then parked on the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). Ronald Reagan is making preparations to execute a homeport change from Bremerton, Wash., to San Diego following a year-long docked planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. (U.S. Navy photos by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Charles D. Gaddis IV/Released)



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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Ven 15 Mar 2013 - 15:11






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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Ven 15 Mar 2013 - 17:42

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U.S. Navy completes Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) shared generator testing

The U.S. Navy’s future carrier aircraft launch system concluded a unique test event today earlier than planned. The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment Program Office (PMA-251)’s Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System, (EMALS), completed shared generator testing at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

EMALS is replacing the current steam catapult system on aircraft carriers, beginning with the Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78).


An F-35C Lightning II test aircraft piloted by Lt. Christopher Tabert launches for the first time from the new electromagnetic aircraft launch system. The new launch system will be installed on the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). (U.S. Navy photo by David Sckrabulis/Released)

“It is important that we ensure proper sharing and operation of the generators at the land-based facility prior to testing the full four-catapult system onboard CVN 78, reducing risk to the ship,” said George Sulich, EMALS integrated team lead.

With EMALS, the aircraft is attached to a shuttle that is propelled down the length of the catapult track by an electromagnetic field produced by the linear motors. The motor generator stores the system’s energy in the inertia of its rotor and releases that energy upon initiation of the aircraft launch.

EMALS consists of six subsystems working together and sharing components to power the four catapults on the ship. The test site only has one catapult so, up to now; the system has only had to control one launcher.


The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) motor generator stores energy in the inertia of its rotor and releases that energy upon initiation of the aircraft launch onboard carriers. EMALS completed shared generator testing at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., today. EMALS is replacing the current steam catapult system on aircraft carriers, beginning with the Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). (U.S. Navy photo)


After completing the system functional demonstration phase in November 2012, the EMALS team readied the site to replicate a four-catapult ship environment. The testing simulated generator-sharing for multiple catapults by launching dead-loads, or weighted sleds.

“As EMALS successfully completes another test phase, I am confident we are providing the fleet with a reliable and efficient system that will revolutionize the way we launch aircraft from the Navy’s newest class of carriers,” said Capt. Jim Donnelly, PMA-251 program manager.

Sulich attributed the team’s ability to team start and finish formal shared testing earlier than planned, to good preparation and coordination.

One such preparation, he said, was using a ship representative controls lab, located at prime industry partner General Atomics’ facility in Rancho Bernardo, Calif., to conduct extensive modeling and simulation of the four-catapult system, ensuring the launch controls were set up correctly.

“Instead of using the full-scale system at Lakehurst to test the full EMALS software suite, we used the ship-representative controls lab,” Sulich said. “By using the lab before we started formal testing, we were able to groom the software so that during commissioning testing we weren’t really discovering anything new.”

EMALS is designed to expand the operational capability of the Navy’s future carriers to include all current and future carrier air wing platforms – lightweight unmanned to heavy strike fighters.

It delivers necessary higher launch energy capacity; substantial improvements in system maintenance; increased reliability and efficiency; and more accurate end-speed control. The system’s technologies allow for a smooth acceleration at both high and low speeds, increasing the carrier’s ability to launch aircraft with less stress on the ship and its systems.

From: NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md.
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Sam 16 Mar 2013 - 13:28

Citation :
US Shipyard Worker Sentenced for Nuclear Sub Fire

WASHINGTON, March 15 (RIA Novosti) - A former naval shipyard worker who confessed to setting a fire aboard a US nuclear submarine causing $450 million in damage was sentenced to 17 years in federal prison Friday in US District Court in Maine.

“From the bottom of my heart, I’m truly sorry,” said 26-year-old Casey Fury during his sentencing hearing. “I can’t put into words the remorse I feel. I had no intention of hurting anyone,” he said according to local media reports.

Fury, who worked as a painter at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine for three years, was sentenced on two counts of arson, resulting from two separate incidents while he was working on the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine.

On May 23, 2012 Fury set fire to a rag and left it on the top bunk of a bed on the submarine, with hopes the commotion of the fire would allow him to leave work early.

The blaze quickly spread, causing widespread damage that took more than ten hours and 100 firefighters to extinguish. Seven people were hurt, the US Navy said.

The second fire took place three weeks later, this time on the outside of the sub. Once again, Fury said he started the blaze because he wanted to go home due to anxiety.

Fury, who initially denied setting the fires, eventually confessed and pled guilty to two counts of arson last November. In addition to the 17-year sentence, Fury was also ordered to pay $400 million in restitution for the damages caused to the submarine.

According to various media reports, the US Navy said it intends to repair the USS Miami, but those plans have been postponed due to the automatic federal budget cuts that went into effect March 1st.



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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Sam 16 Mar 2013 - 15:08

Citation :
the John Warner (Virginia-class sub, SSN-785) is already under construction,



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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Dim 17 Mar 2013 - 2:02





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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Lun 18 Mar 2013 - 12:11

Citation :
U.S. Navy Lays Keel for Pre-Commissioning Unit John Warner (SSN 785), Virginia class SSN


The U.S. Navy celebrated the keel laying of Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) John Warner (SSN 785) at Huntington Ingalls Industries - Newport News Shipbuilding (HII -NNS) in Newport News, Va., March 16. The submarine is named for former five-term U.S. Senator from Virginia and Secretary of the Navy John Warner.


Artist Impression of a Virginia class submarine under water
(picture: US Navy)



In a time-honored Navy tradition, the initials of Jeanne Warner, the submarine's sponsor, were welded onto a steel plate that will be permanently affixed to the submarine's hull. Mrs. Warner is a long-time supporter of military families and is active in many local Virginia-based charities. Making the ceremony unique, the submarine's namesake also had his initials welded onto the plate.

"The Navy and the submarine force are honored to have Mrs. Warner serve as the sponsor for the future USS John Warner," said Capt. David Goggins, Virginia-class program manager. "The event marks the first major construction milestone for the submarine and helps forge a special bond between Mrs. Warner, her submarine, and her crew that will last for years to come."

John Warner's keel laying is the submarine's first major event since it began construction in March 2010. The submarine is on track to continue the Virginia-class program's trend of delivering submarines early to their contract delivery dates and meeting the incredibly stringent standards expected of U.S. submarines.

"John Warner's keel laying is a special day for our Navy, the Commonwealth of Virginia and our shipbuilding partners," said Rear Adm. David Johnson, Program Executive Officer for Submarines. "Building the Virginia class is a team effort and the skill and commitment of the entire shipbuilding team is evident in the first-time quality and operational successes of these front-line platforms."

John Warner is the 12th submarine of the Virginia class and the second of the block III construction contract. Virginia-class submarines are built under a unique construction contract between HII-NNS and General Dynamics Electric Boat.

Warner's keel laying is the first of several major shipbuilding milestones for the Virginia-class program in 2013. PCU Minnesota's (SSN 783) commissioning is scheduled for Sept. 7 and PCU North Dakota's (SSN 784) christening is expected this fall. PCU Delaware (SSN 791) will begin construction Sept. 2.

Virginia Class submarines are designed to dominate the world's littoral and deep waters while conducting anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; irregular warfare; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility, and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six Maritime Strategy Core Capabilities - sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence.
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Lun 18 Mar 2013 - 13:34

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GULF OF THAILAND (Feb. 15, 2013) Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Adam Polkowski surveys the Gulf of Thailand from an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter


Citation :
Pacific Ocean (Jan. 11, 2006) The Nimitz-class aircraft


Citation :
PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 11, 2013) Sailors participate in flight deck barricade drills aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft


Citation :
PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 3, 2013) Sailors participate in a fight deck scrubbing exercise aboard the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mar 19 Mar 2013 - 13:13

Citation :
US Navy Instruction Confirms Retirement of Nuclear Tomahawk Cruise Missile


By Hans M. Kristensen

Although the U.S. Navy has yet to make a formal announcement that the nuclear Tomahawk land-attack cruise missile (TLAM/N) has been retired, a new updated navy instruction shows that the weapon is gone.

The evidence comes not in the form of an explicit statement, but from what has been deleted from the U.S. Navy’s instruction Department of the Navy Nuclear Weapons Responsibilities and Authorities (SECNAVINST 8120.1A).

While the previous version of the instruction from 2010 included a whole sub-section describing TLAM/N responsibilities, the new version published on February 15, 2013, contains no mentioning of the TLAM/N at all and the previous sub-section has been deleted.

The U.S. Navy is finally out of the non-strategic nuclear weapons business. The stockpile has declined and a substantial number of TLAM/N warheads (W80-0) have already been dismantled.

The End Of An Era

The retirement of the TLAM/N completes a 25-year process of eliminating all non-strategic naval nuclear weapons from the U.S. Navy’s arsenal.

In 1989, diligent researchers using the Freedom of Information Act discovered that the navy planned to unilaterally retire three of its non-strategic nuclear weapons.


Retirement of the TLAM/N comes two decades after the U.S. Navy retired the SUBROC, ASROC, and Terrier.
The first to go was the SUBROC, a submarine-launched rocket introduced in 1965 to deliver a 5-kiloton nuclear torpedo against another submarine. The SUBROC was widely deployed on attack submarines for 24 years and retired in 1989.

The ASROC was next in line, a ship-launched rocket introduced in 1961 to deliver a 10-kiloton depth bomb against submarines. The ASROC was widely deployed on cruisers, destroyers, and frigates for 29 years and retired in 1990.

The third non-strategic nuclear weapon to be unilaterally retired was the nuclear Terrier, a ship-launched surface-to-air missile introduced in 1961 to deliver a 1-kiloton warhead against aircraft. The nuclear Terrier was retired in 1990 after 29 years.

These weapons had little military value but huge political consequences when they sailed into ports of allied countries whose governments were forced to ignore violation of their own non-nuclear policies to avoid being seen as disloyal to their nuclear-armed ally.

The Regan administration planned to replace all of these weapons with new types: the SUBROC would be replaced by the Sea Lance rocket; the ASROC would be replaced with the Vertical ASROC; and the Terrier was to be replaced by the Standard 2 missile. But all of these replacement programs were cancelled. The Harpoon cruise missile was also intended to have a nuclear warhead option, but that was also canceled. Originally 758 TLAM/Ns were planned but only 350 were built, and 260 were left when the Obama administration decided to retire the weapon.

After the unilateral retirement of the SUBROC, ASROC, and Terrier missiles, the navy was left with B61 and B57 bombs on aircraft carriers and land-based anti-submarine aircraft, as well as the TLAM/N. Work initially continued on the B90 NSDB (nuclear strike and depth bomb) to replace the naval B61 and B57, but in September 1991 president George H.W. Bush unilaterally cancelled the program and ordered the offloading and withdrawal of all non-strategic nuclear weapons.

The Clinton administration’s 1994 Nuclear Posture Review followed up by denuclearizing the entire surface fleet, leaving only TLAM/N for some of the navy’s attack submarines. The missiles were stored on land, however, and never made it back to sea.

In the early part of the George W. Bush administration, the navy wanted to retire the TLAM/N, but some officials in the National Security Council and the Office of the Secretary of Defense insisted that the weapon was needed for certain missions in defense of allied countries. As a result, the TLAM/N survived the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review, and up through 2005 the navy continued to test launch the missile from attack submarines.

Some official and lobbyists tried to protect the TLAM/N during the 2009 Congressional Strategic Posture Commission process, but they failed. The Obama administration’s 2010 Nuclear Posture Review determined that the TLAM/N should finally be retired because it was redundant.

Implications

More than two decades after the end of the Cold War, and tens of millions of dollars and countless of navy personnel hours wasted on retaining the TLAM/N, the weapon has finally been retired and the navy is out of the non-strategic nuclear weapons business altogether.

This is monumental achievement and marks the end of a long process. In 1987, the U.S. Navy possessed more than 3,700 non-strategic nuclear weapons for use by almost 240 nuclear-capable ships and attack submarines in nuclear battles on the high seas. Today the number is zero.

Submarine crews can finally focus on real-world operations without the burden of non-strategic nuclear weapons, and government officials from the United States and its Pacific allies can finally begin to think about how to structure extended deterrence without clinging to the Cold War illusion that it requires tactical naval nuclear weapons.

I only wish the Obama administration and its allies were not so timid about the achievement. The unilateral elimination of naval non-strategic nuclear weapons is an important milestone in U.S. nuclear weapons history that demonstrates that non-strategic nuclear weapons have lost their military and political value. Russia has partly followed the initiative by eliminating a third of its non-strategic naval nuclear weapons since 1991, but is holding on to the rest to compensate against superior U.S. conventional naval forces.

But why not propose to Russia that they follow the TLAM/N retirement by retiring their nuclear land-attack cruise missile, the SS-N-21, and stop building new ones? The land-attack cruise missiles have nothing to do with compensating for naval conventional inferiority. Highlighting the retirement of the TLAM/N, moreover, might even help undercut some of the North Korean Generals’ rhetoric about a U.S. nuclear threat. Milk the TLAM/N retirement for all it’s worth!
http://www.fas.org

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mer 20 Mar 2013 - 10:15

Citation :
VAQ 136 Completes Prowler to Growler Transition, Certified 'Safe for Flight'

By Lt. Grant Jarvis, Electronic Attack Squadron 136
NAVAL AIR STATION WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. (NNS) -- The "Gauntlets" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 136 were certified "safe for flight" March 12, after completing an 11-month transition from the EA-6B Prowler to the new EA-18G Growler.

Cmdr. Scott Hardy, VAQ-136 commanding officer, said the successful transition from the Prowler to Growler was possibly due to his team's commitment and tenacity.

"I am extremely proud of our squadron's hard work and dedication over the past year," said Hardy. "The level of excellence that this squadron has shown in transition to the EA-18G is a testament to the Sailors and the families of VAQ-136."

While this certification is a major milestone for VAQ-136, it also has historical significance as this squadron served as the Navy's forward deployed electronic attack squadron based out of Atsugi, Japan, for 32 years.

The Gauntlets began their transition in March 2012, when their maintainers were sent to Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., to begin honing their EA-18G Growler maintenance skills.

"I was very impressed with the equipment and instruction given," said Aviation Electrician's Mate Airman Michelle L. Walter.

Meanwhile, the 'Ironclaw' aircrew began their transition in April 2012, under the tutelage of VAQ-129 instructors. The in-depth transition program at the Fleet Replacement Squadron taught them operating procedures and advanced tactics in the Navy's newest and most technologically advanced aircraft.

"I was truly impressed with the capabilities of the new platform," said Lt. Louis Majerchin, VAQ-136 AV/ARM division officer.

The culmination of the squadron's transition was a series of inspections and proficiency checks. One of these was the Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection, administered by Commander, Electronic Attack Wing U.S. Pacific Fleet. Netting outstanding results, Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Stephen Guz received special recognition for his concise communication and leadership during the inspection.

After proving they were fully capable to safely and efficiently perform all weapons evolutions for the EA-18G, VAQ-136 was ready to finish their transition by completing the Fleet Integration Team (FIT) and Wing Maintenance Program Assist (MPA)inspections, which are designed to provide feedback on its ability to run autonomously.

The squadron's performance during the FIT MPA was lauded by inspectors, who gave recognition to Aviation Maintenance Administration 3rd Class Ann Marie Chessari, Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Mervyngil Salomon, Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Joseph Fineg and Aviation Mechanist's Mate 1st Class Kristan Reynolds for their management of the Maintenance Admin, Taxi/Turn, ABO surveillance and Aircraft Confined Space programs respectively.

"One thirty six has set the bar very high," said Maintenance Master Chief Jeffery Amidon of the Electronic Attack Wing. "It will be difficult for other transition squadrons to achieve your results."

Other Gauntlets recognized for their job performance during the inspection included Aviation Maintenance Administration 3rd Class Maddalyn Penna, Logistics Specialist 1st Class Joseph Lejos, Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Heather Hankins, Aviation Maintenance Administration Airman Tyler Goldstien, Chief Aviation Maintenance Administration Robyn Heath, Aviation Maintenance Administration 2nd Class Sheila Maalihan, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 1st Class Holly Farrell and Airman Samuel Wiberg.

VAQ-136's aircrew ended their transition syllabus with carrier qualifications on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) this month. The 11 fliers made more than 60 day and night carrier traps to ensure they were ready for shipboard operations.

Capt. John Springett, commander, Electronic Attack Wing U.S. Pacific Fleet, presented VAQ-136 with their official safe-for-flight certification letter March 15, durign a ceremony held in the squadron's hangar.

"Your successful transition to the EA-18G marks an important milestone in the squadron's superb history of conducting Airborne Electronic Attack," said Springett. "Today, your responsibility is clear. I expect you to focus on the expert employment of these new aircraft in order to protect those who go into harm's way."

Following its new certification and stateside return, VAQ-136 recast their squadron insignia. The new insignia embodies the squadron's newfound capabilities while paying homage to their heritage overseas.

The Gauntlet remains on the new insignia while holding a sword symbolic of the enhanced lethality of the EA-18G. Lightning around the blade represents the squadron's core mission of non-kinetic power. The Japanese 'kanji' for 'Spirit of Attack' located upon the sword handle is the same symbol brandished for years on Gauntlet aircraft while stationed to NAF Atsugi, Japan.

VAQ-136 will continue to train and prepare for future combat operations with Carrier Air Wing Nine aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

For more news from Commander, Naval Air Forces, visit www.navy.mil/local/airpac/.

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mer 20 Mar 2013 - 19:39

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Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group Arrives in U.S. 5th Fleet

USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group (IKE CSG) arrived in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) March 15.

The mission of the IKE CSG is to promote maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the AOR.

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 is comprised of flagship USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) with embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 and guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66).

The ships returned to their homeports in December for maintenance, and were redeployed with German frigate FGS Hamburg (F220) Feb. 21 to support requirements in the U.S. Navy's 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operations.

"This strike group returns to the U.S. 5th Fleet AOR trained, experienced, and ready," said Rear Adm. Michael C. Manazir, IKE CSG commander. "We are poised to work with our coalition and regional partners to keep maritime lanes open. The Sailors of Carrier Strike Group Eight are committed to ensuring the conditions for economic prosperity in this region."

The IKE CSG will relieve the John C. Stennis Strike Group in support of U.S. Central Command operational requirements.

For more news from USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), visit www.navy.mil/local/cvn69/.
http://www.navy.mil

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Jeu 21 Mar 2013 - 16:52




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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Jeu 21 Mar 2013 - 19:37

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US Navy may add conformal fuel tanks to F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fleet

The US Navy is considering adding conformal fuel tanks (CFTs) onto its fleet of Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet strike fighters, sources say. The twin dorsally mounted tanks are expected to be tested this summer.

The USN does not deny that it is interested in the conformal tanks, but says that it cannot comment on the project at this time. "As of right now this information is proprietarily owned between Boeing and Northrop [Grumman] and PMA-265 cannot talk to it," the Naval Air Systems Command says. PMA-265 is the US Navy programme office responsible for managing the F/A-18 and EA-18G fleets.

Boeing officials did not respond to queries prior to publication.


US Navy

The CFTs, which Boeing has pitched to potential buyers as part of its Super Hornet international roadmap, would allow the F/A-18E/F to carry more than 1,590kg (3,500lb) of additional fuel. "Adding these tanks would make a great deal of sense," says Mark Gunzinger, an airpower analyst at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. "The navy really needs to extend the reach of its carrier air wings. Increased range will be needed for potential operations in the Pacific region and elsewhere."

The USN's efforts to add CFTs might be part of the service's plan to hedge its bets in case of further delays to the Lockheed Martin F-35C, or if budgetary pressures force the navy to abandon that variant. "At this point, the F-35C is easily the most troubled variant," says Richard Aboulafia, an analyst at the Teal Group. The USN has always been lukewarm toward the stealthy single-engined fighter even if senior service leaders always publicly profess that the service "needs" the F-35C.

But there are questions as to whether the Super Hornet can support the added weight and drag of the CFTs without seriously impairing its aerodynamic performance. "One problem with CFTs on the F/A-18 is that I'm not really sure it has the power," Aboulafia says. "If they put CFTs on the [Boeing] F-15 and [Lockheed] F-16, they're fast jets. But the Super Hornet is already pretty much slowest in class."

Boeing officials have previously said that the addition of the CFTs does not add any cruise drag, but they admit that the appliqué fuel tanks would have a negative impact on the aircraft's transonic acceleration because of the increased waved drag. Transonic acceleration has always been a weak spot for the Super Hornet, and many pilots say the aircraft is seriously underpowered compared to other fourth-generation fighters. "You're talking about something that impairs its performance for an aircraft that already has some performance issues," Aboulafia says. "But it might be worth it, given the issue of finding an alternative to the F-35C. It's certainly worth experimenting with."

If the USN were to add CFTs to the F/A-18E/F, it might also have to upgrade the aircraft's twin General Electric (GE) F414-GE-400 afterburning turbofans which produce 22,000lbs (98 kN) thrust each, Aboulafia says. GE has previously touted an enhanced performance engine (EPE) variant of the F414, which could produce 26,400lbs (120 kN) thrust. It would, however, require a redesigned fan and a new high pressure core. But Aboulafia questions if GE can deliver on those promises. "I'm not sure how much more thrust you can get out of that series," he says. "Maybe there is a bit more they can go that would give them the power."

But given the US government's current financial situation, the USN may not be able to pay for a programme to add CFTs to the Super Hornet. "It will be difficult to start a new programme for this anytime soon," Gunzinger says. Aboulafia says that is true, but money could potentially be siphoned from the USN's F-35 accounts. "For a few people at least, especially the navy, the F-35 is as much a potential bill-payer as it is an acquisitions programme." Funding for the tri-service stealth fighter has been a bone of contention between the US Marine Corps and the blue-water navy for quite some time, Aboulafia says.
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Ven 22 Mar 2013 - 0:34

Citation :

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) transits the Suez Canal



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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Ven 22 Mar 2013 - 11:02

Citation :
First Rapid Prototype Torpedo Warning System Testing On Board CVN


USS GEORGE H.W. BUSH, At Sea (NNS) -- USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) PMS 415's Surface Ship Torpedo Defense (SSTD) team began at-sea testing and data collection of the Rapid Prototype Torpedo Warning System (TWS) and Countermeasure Anti-Torpedo (CAT) system, March 19.

This marks the first aircraft carrier employment of the TWS, which was installed during the ship's recent planned incremental availability (PIA) period.

The TWS was streamed in order to collect acoustic data and fine tune the system. The SSTD team, led by PMS 415 Program Manager, Capt. Moises DelToro, has worked on this high priority Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) system in order to be operational for CVN 77's upcoming deployment. Capt. DelToro and the SSTD Team have been extremely impressed and grateful for the support, enthusiasm, and professionalism shown by the ship's crew members during the testing and install period.

The TWS/CAT was previously tested only on board smaller ships, such as destroyers, but in 2011 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Jonathan Greenert, approved the system for use on board aircraft carriers. USS George H.W. Bush was chosen to be the first to test and operate this rapid prototype system.

According to Brad Robinson, TWS/CAT fleet liaison, the at-sea testing is a major milestone.

"We are able to put this array into the water and collect valuable data to enhance our software and make it a much more reliable alert system when it goes on deployment," said Robinson. "We are collecting noise and acoustics that we were unable to previously collect."

Over the next few months, CVN 77 will continue to test the TWS/CAT, allowing Sailors an opportunity to increase their knowledge of the system and ensure safe operation in the future.

"Our sonar technicians (surface) are learning how to work and use the system this week. We're really excited to have it on board," said Cmdr. Andrew Walton, the ship's operations officer. "While the NAVSEA team is embarked they'll be able to make adjustments for future operation based on the lessons learned."

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) is currently completing training qualifications.
http://www.navy.mil

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Dim 24 Mar 2013 - 23:59

une dose d'adrenaline avec un F18 ...ça fait toujours du bien ..
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Lun 25 Mar 2013 - 0:40




Citation :
(March 20, 2013) The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after three months at sea




Citation :
RED SEA (March 18, 2013) A Sailor guides an F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to the Jolly Rogers of Strike Fighter Squadron


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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Lun 25 Mar 2013 - 12:05

Citation :
PEARL HARBOR (March 22, 2013) The Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX) leaves a pier on Ford Island as the SBX transits the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. The SBX is a combination of the world's largest phased-array X-band radar carried aboard a mobile, ocean-going semi-submersible oil platform. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)






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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mar 26 Mar 2013 - 8:42

Citation :
Faute de crédits, l’US Navy annule une série de déploiements
26/03/2013
L’absence d’accord entre le gouvernement fédéral et le congrès sur le budget 2013 a de nouvelles répercussions sur l’activité de la marine américaine. Ce week-end, l’US Navy a annoncé qu’elle était contrainte, faute de crédits, d’annuler plusieurs déploiements en mars. La frégate USS Rentz et le sous-marin nucléaire d’attaque USS Jefferson City vont, ainsi, rester à leur base de San Diego, alors que la frégate USS Thach a reçu l’ordre de regagner les Etats-Unis avant la fin programmée de sa mission au large de l’Amérique latine. Vendredi déjà, l’état-major de la marine américaine avait annoncé que les déploiements du navire hôpital USNS Comfort et de la frégate USS Kauffman (Caraïbes) devaient être reportés, de même que celui du bâtiment de soutien USNS Grasp en Europe. Si les mesures de séquestration se poursuivent faute d’accord sur le budget à Washington, d’autres mesures de ce type devront être adoptées, a prévenu le secrétaire d’Etat à la marine. Ce dernier a indiqué que, dans la situation actuelle, les ressources financières disponibles pour l’US Navy étaient réservées aux opérations prioritaires. Les bateaux qui ne peuvent quitter leurs bases ou doivent rentrer prématurément resteront à quai, où leurs équipages assureront leur maintenance et s’entraineront avec les moyens disponibles.
http://www.meretmarine.com/fr/content/faute-de-credits-lus-navy-annule-une-serie-de-deploiements

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mar 26 Mar 2013 - 12:03

Citation :
Boeing Assessing Effect Of Advanced Sensor On P-8 Life

Boeing is to receive a U.S. Navy contract to conduct additional fatigue testing on the P-8A Poseidon to determine the effects on airframe life of carrying the Raytheon Advanced Aerial Sensor (AAS) long-range, high-resolution surveillance radar.

The AAS is a dual-sided, active, electronically scanned array radar with a 40-ft.-long antenna housed in a pod mounted on a trapeze under the forward fuselage. The radar is designed to be carried on P-8As fitted with structural provisions for the pod.

Under a $138 million effort running through fiscal 2017, Boeing will conduct an engineering analysis of the AAS on the Poseidon airframe. This will include evaluating different mixes of AAS surveillance and P-8A maritime-patrol mission profiles to identify an optimum mix for future operations, according to Navy documentation.

The analysis will identify fatigue-critical areas specific to the AAS mission and compare them with those for the basic maritime-patrol mission. The S-2 full-scale fatigue-test article at Boeing will conduct two complete AAS mission lifetimes and a third P-8A mission lifetime, followed by a residual-strength test and a tear-down analysis.

Raytheon was awarded a contract in July 2009 to develop the AAS, a modernized evolution of the once-classified APS-149 Littoral Surveillance Radar Sensor carried by a small number of Navy Lockheed P-3C Orions.

Boeing received a $277 million contract in February 2012 to modify the first development P-8A, aircraft T-1, for aerodynamic and structural tests of the AAS radar pod. These tests are to be completed by August 2016.

Last year it emerged that the P-8A static-test article, S-1, had been diverted briefly to help with tests of the AAS. This had delayed the start of live-fire tests using S-1, required to support the decision on full-rate production of the P-8A.

An initial operational capability date for the AAS has not been revealed, but Boeing and Navy briefings have suggested it is likely to follow the scheduled 2016 fielding for the Increment 2 upgrade for the Poseidon.
http://www.aviationweek.com

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Sam 30 Mar 2013 - 23:42

Citation :
SUEZ CANAL (March 16, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) passes the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) during a transit of the Suez Canal


Citation :
GULF OF ADEN (March 23, 2013) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) conducts a replenishment-at-sea with the Supply-class fast combat support ship the USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10).


Citation :
ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 26, 2013) Waves crash over the bow of the guided-missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81).
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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mar 2 Avr 2013 - 11:39

Citation :
U.S. Navy Awards Lockheed Martin $57 Million Contract to Upgrade Electronic Warfare Ship Defense System

SYRACUSE, N.Y., April 1, 2013 – The U.S. Navy awarded Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] a $57 million contract to upgrade the fleet’s electronic warfare defenses against anti-ship missile threats.
Under this low-rate production contract for Block 2 of the Navy’s Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP), Lockheed Martin will upgrade the AN/SLQ-32(V)2 system found on all U.S. aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and other warships with key capabilities to determine if the electronic sensors of potential foes are stalking the ship.
“The SEWIP Block 2 upgrade will ensure the AN/SLQ-32 system continues to outpace the threat and establishes a framework to easily install future upgrades,” said Joe Ottaviano, SEWIP program director for Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. “The system is the first sensor to be fully compliant with the Navy’s Product Line Architecture strategy, which facilitates the rapid introduction of new technology into the fleet. By using commercial-off-the-shelf components, we provide additional cost savings and ease of maintenance for sailors."
Block 2 is the latest in an evolutionary succession of improvement “blocks” the Navy is pursuing for its shipboard electronic warfare system, which will incrementally add new defensive technologies and functional capabilities. The Navy competitively awarded Lockheed Martin a contract in 2009 to develop SEWIP Block 2 and the company recently completed successful integration and test activities for two engineering development models.
Work on the SEWIP program will be performed at the company’s Syracuse, N.Y. facility, which houses a new electronic warfare system test facility.
In January 2012, Lockheed Martin teamed with Raytheon Company, the original developer of the AN/SLQ-32, to pursue the Navy’s competitive SEWIP Block 3 program, which will upgrade the system’s electronic attack electronic warfare capabilities. The team demonstrated its potential Block 3 solution at last summer’s multi-national Rim of the Pacific naval exercises. A formal Navy request for Block 3 proposals is anticipated later this year.
Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 120,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products, and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.
http://www.lockheedmartin.com

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mer 3 Avr 2013 - 11:10

Citation :
PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (April 2, 2013) Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Charlotte (SSN 766) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region. Commissioned in September 1994, Charlotte is the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for Charlotte, N.C. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)




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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mer 3 Avr 2013 - 11:49

Citation :
Boeing handed over the seventh production P-8A Poseidon to the U.S. Navy

SEATTLE, April 2, 2013 -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] handed over the seventh production P-8A Poseidon to the U.S. Navy on schedule March 29, marking the first delivery from the second low-rate initial production contract awarded in November 2011.
The maritime patrol aircraft departed Boeing Field in Seattle for Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Fla., where it joined six P-8As currently being used to train Navy crews.
"This is our second P-8A delivery of 2013, and we'll continue to provide the Navy with new Poseidon aircraft at a rate of nearly one a month," said Rick Heerdt, Boeing vice president and P-8 program manager. "We've got a full factory of P-8As for the U.S. Navy and P-8I aircraft for India, and we're working side-by-side with both customers to introduce the aircraft's advanced capabilities into their fleets."
Boeing is on contract to build and support 24 P-8A aircraft as part of three LRIP contracts awarded in 2011 and 2012. The Navy plans to purchase 117 P-8As, which are based on the Next-Generation Boeing 737-800 platform. The versatile multi-mission aircraft provides broad long-range maritime patrol capabilities -- anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance -- and will replace the Navy P-3 fleet.
http://boeing.mediaroom.com

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MessageSujet: Re: US Navy   Mer 3 Avr 2013 - 18:56

Citation :
U.S. deploys Sea based X-Band Radar (SBX) to detect potential North Korean Missile Launch


The United States has deployed its Sea-based X-Band radar to the ocean east of Japan to detect any potential North Korean ballistic missile launches. The SBX is a combination of the world's largest phased-array X-band radar carried aboard a mobile, ocean-going semi-submersible oil platform.

In case of a ballistic missile launch, it would be able to detect the missile and track its trajectory. This data would then be used by other platform (such as US Navy Destroyers in the area) to shoot the missile down.


PEARL HARBOR (March 22, 2013) The Sea-Based X-Band Radar (SBX) transits the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. The SBX, headed to sea for systems checks, is a combination of the world's largest phased-array X-band radar carried aboard a mobile, ocean-going semi-submersible oil platform. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)

A Pentagon official said the move was a “routine deployment” that is “not in relation to current events.” The same official said however that the deployement of destroyer USS John McCain was linked to the current crisis.

The SBX is a floating, self-propelled, mobile radar station designed to operate in high winds and heavy seas. It is part of the U.S. Defense Department Ballistic Missile Defense System. The Sea-Based X-Band Radar is mounted on a fifth generation CS-50 twin-hulled semi-submersible drilling rig. SBX-1 is part of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system being deployed by the Missile Defense Agency. Being sea-based allows the vessel to be moved to areas where they are needed for enhanced missile defense.

http://www.navyrecognition.com

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